Disclaimer:

Medidex is not a provider of medical services and all information is provided for the convenience of the user. No medical decisions should be made based on the information provided on this website without first consulting a licensed healthcare provider.This website is intended for persons 18 years or older. No person under 18 should consult this website without the permission of a parent or guardian.

Indomethacin extended-release

&times

Overview

What is Indomethacin extended-release?

Indomethacin cannot be considered a simple analgesic and should not be used in conditions other than those recommended under .

Indomethacin is a nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory, indole derivative designated chemically as 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1-indole-3-acetic acid. Indomethacin is practically insoluble in water and sparingly soluble in alcohol. It has a pKa of 4.5 and is stable in neutral or slightly acidic media and decomposes in strong alkali. The structural formula is:

Each extended-release capsule, for oral administration contains 75 mg of indomethacin. In addition, each capsule contains the following inactive ingredients: D&C yellow No. 10, D&C yellow No. 10 aluminum lake, FD&C blue No. 1 aluminum lake, FD&C blue No. 2 aluminum lake, FD&C red No. 40 aluminum lake, FD&C green No. 3, ethylcellulose, gelatin, lactose monohydrate, povidone, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate, corn starch, sucrose, talc and titanium dioxide.

This product meets USP Drug Release Test 2 Specifications.



What does Indomethacin extended-release look like?



What are the available doses of Indomethacin extended-release?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Indomethacin extended-release?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Indomethacin extended-release?

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of indomethacin extended-release capsules and other treatment options before deciding to use indomethacin extended-release capsules. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see ).

Indomethacin extended-release capsules have been found effective in active stages of the following:

1. Moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis including acute flares of chronic disease.

2. Moderate to severe ankylosing spondylitis.

3. Moderate to severe osteoarthritis.

4. Acute painful shoulder (bursitis and/or tendinitis).

Indomethacin extended-release capsules is not recommended for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis.

Indomethacin may enable the reduction of steroid dosage in patients receiving steroids for the more severe forms of rheumatoid arthritis. In such instances the steroid dosage should be reduced slowly and the patients followed very closely for any possible adverse effects.

The use of indomethacin in conjunction with aspirin or other salicylates is not recommended. Controlled clinical studies have shown that the combined use of indomethacin and aspirin does not produce greater therapeutic effect than the use of indomethacin alone. Furthermore, in one of these clinical studies, the incidence of gastrointestinal side effects was significantly increased with combined therapy. (See ).

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of indomethacin extended-release capsules and other treatment options before deciding to use indomethacin extended-release capsules. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see ).

Indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg are available for oral use. Indomethacin extended-release capsules can be administered once a day and can be substituted for indomethacin 25 mg capsules t.i.d. However, there will be significant differences between the two dosage regimens in indomethacin blood levels, especially after 12 hours (see ). In addition, indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg b.i.d. can be substituted for indomethacin 50 mg capsules t.i.d. Indomethacin extended-release capsules may be substituted for all the indications of indomethacin capsules except acute gouty arthritis.

Adverse reactions appear to correlate with the size of the dose of indomethacin in most patients, but not all. Therefore, every effort should be made to determine the smallest effective dosage for the individual patient.

Always give indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg with food, immediately after meals or with antacids to reduce gastric irritation.


What interacts with Indomethacin extended-release?

Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to indomethacin.


Indomethacin extended-release capsules should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients (see and ).


Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see ).



What are the warnings of Indomethacin extended-release?

Cardiovascular Effects

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

 

There is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin mitigates the increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events associated with NSAID use. The concurrent use of aspirin and a NSAID does increase the risk of serious GI events (see , ).

Two large, controlled, clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10 to 14 days following CABG surgery found an increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke (see ).

Hypertension

 

Congestive Heart Failure and Edema

 

Gastrointestinal Effects

Risk of Ulceration, Bleeding and Perforation

 

NSAIDs should be prescribed with extreme caution in those with a prior history of ulcer disease or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with a who use NSAIDs have a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients with neither of these risk factors. Other factors that increase the risk for GI bleeding in patients treated with NSAIDs include concomitant use of oral corticosteroids or anticoagulants, longer duration of NSAID therapy, smoking, use of alcohol, older age and poor general health status. Most spontaneous reports of fatal GI events are in elderly or debilitated patients and therefore, special care should be taken in treating this population.

To minimize the potential risk for an adverse GI event in patients treated with a NSAID, the lowest effective dose should be used for the shortest possible duration. Patients and physicians should remain alert for signs and symptoms of GI ulceration and bleeding during NSAID therapy and promptly initiate additional evaluation and treatment if a serious GI adverse event is suspected. This should include discontinuation of the NSAID until a serious GI adverse event is ruled out. For high risk patients, alternate therapies that do not involve NSAIDs should be considered.

Renal Effects

Long-term administration of NSAIDs has resulted in renal papillary necrosis and other renal injury. Renal toxicity has also been seen in patients in whom renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in the maintenance of renal perfusion. In these patients, administration of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may cause a dose-dependent reduction in prostaglandin formation and, secondarily, in renal blood flow, which may precipitate overt renal decompensation. Patients at greatest risk of this reaction are those with impaired renal function, heart failure, liver dysfunction, those taking diuretics and ACE inhibitors and the elderly. Discontinuation of NSAID therapy is usually followed by recovery to the pretreatment state.

Advanced Renal Disease

 

Anaphylactoid Reactions

As with other NSAIDs, anaphylactoid reactions may occur in patients without known prior exposure to indomethacin extended-release capsules. Indomethacin extended-release capsules should not be given to patients with the aspirin triad. This symptom complex typically occurs in asthmatic patients who experience rhinitis with or without nasal polyps or who exhibit severe, potentially fatal bronchospasm after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs (see and ). Emergency help should be sought in cases where an anaphylactoid reaction occurs.

Skin Reactions

NSAIDs, including indomethacin extended-release capsules, can cause serious skin adverse events such as exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), which can be fatal. These serious events may occur without warning. Patients should be informed about the signs and symptoms of serious skin manifestations and use of the drug should be discontinued at the first appearance of skin rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity.

Pregnancy

In late pregnancy, as with other NSAIDs, indomethacin extended-release capsules should be avoided because it may cause premature closure of the ductus arteriosus.


What are the precautions of Indomethacin extended-release?

General

Indomethacin extended-release capsules cannot be expected to substitute for corticosteroids or to treat corticosteroid insufficiency. Abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids may lead to disease exacerbation. Patients on prolonged corticosteroid therapy should have their therapy tapered slowly if a decision is made to discontinue corticosteroids.

The pharmacological activity of indomethacin extended-release capsules in reducing [fever and] inflammation may diminish the utility of these diagnostic signs in detecting complications of presumed noninfectious, painful conditions.

Hepatic Effects

Borderline elevations of one or more liver tests may occur in up to 15% of patients taking NSAIDs including indomethacin extended-release capsules. These laboratory abnormalities may progress, may remain unchanged or may be transient with continuing therapy. Notable elevations of ALT or AST (approximately three or more times the upper limit of normal) have been reported in approximately 1% of patients in clinical trials with NSAIDs. In addition, rare cases of hepatic reactions, including jaundice and fatal fulminant hepatitis, liver necrosis and hepatic failure, some of them with fatal outcomes have been reported.

A patient with symptoms and/or signs suggesting liver dysfunction or in whom an abnormal liver test has occurred, should be evaluated for evidence of the development of a more severe hepatic reaction while on therapy with indomethacin extended-release capsules. If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with liver disease develop or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, etc.), indomethacin extended-release capsules should be discontinued.

Hematological Effects

Anemia is sometimes seen in patients receiving NSAIDs, including indomethacin extended-release capsules. This may be due to fluid retention, occult or gross GI blood loss or an incompletely described effect upon erythropoiesis. Patients on long-term treatment with NSAIDs, including indomethacin extended-release capsules, should have their hemoglobin or hematocrit checked if they exhibit any signs or symptoms of anemia.

NSAIDs inhibit platelet aggregation and have been shown to prolong bleeding time in some patients. Unlike aspirin, their effect on platelet function is quantitatively less, of shorter duration and reversible. Patients receiving indomethacin extended-release capsules who may be adversely affected by alterations in platelet function, such as those with coagulation disorders or patients receiving anticoagulants, should be carefully monitored.

Preexisting Asthma

Patients with asthma may have aspirin-sensitive asthma. The use of aspirin in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma has been associated with severe bronchospasm which can be fatal. Since cross reactivity, including bronchospasm, between aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported in such aspirin-sensitive patients, indomethacin extended-release capsules should not be administered to patients with this form of aspirin sensitivity and should be used with caution in patients with preexisting asthma.

Information for Patients















                Patients should be informed of the following information before initiating therapy with a NSAID and periodically during the course of ongoing therapy. Patients should also be encouraged to read the NSAID Medication Guide that accompanies each prescription dispensed.

                Laboratory Tests

                Because serious GI tract ulcerations and bleeding can occur without warning symptoms, physicians should monitor for signs or symptoms of GI bleeding. Patients on long-term treatment with NSAIDs, should have their CBC and a chemistry profile checked periodically. If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with liver or renal disease develop, systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, etc.) or if abnormal liver tests persist or worsen, indomethacin extended-release capsules should be discontinued.

                Interactions

                Drug Interactions

                ACE-Inhibitors

                 

                Aspirin

                 

                Furosemide

                 

                WARNINGS,

                Lithium

                 

                Methotrexate

                 

                Warfarin

                 

                Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

                Only if positive interactions have been observed. (See 201.57 (f)(4)(N))

                Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

                Usually only if significant findings have been observed. (See 201.57 (f)(5))

                Pregnancy

                Teratogenic Effects

                Pregnancy Category C 

                 Reproductive studies conducted in rats and rabbits have not demonstrated evidence of developmental abnormalities. However, animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.

                Nonteratogenic Effects

                Because of the known effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the fetal cardiovascular system (closure of ductus arteriosus), use during pregnancy (particularly late pregnancy) should be avoided.

                Labor and Delivery

                In rat studies with NSAIDs, as with other drugs known to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, an increased incidence of dystocia, delayed parturition and decreased pup survival occurred. The effects of indomethacin extended-release capsules on labor and delivery in pregnant women are unknown.

                Nursing Mothers

                It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human-milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from indomethacin extended-release capsules, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

                Pediatric Use

                Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 14 years old have not been established.

                Geriatric Use

                As with any NSAIDs, caution should be exercised in treating the elderly (65 years and older).


                What are the side effects of Indomethacin extended-release?

                The adverse reactions for indomethacin capsules listed in the following table have been arranged into two groups: 1) incidence greater than 1% and (2) incidence less than 1%. The incidence for group (1) was obtained from 33 double-blind controlled clinical trials reported in the literature (1,092 patients). The incidence for group (2) was based on reports in clinical trials, in the literature and on voluntary reports since marketing. The probability of a causal relationship exists between indomethacin and these adverse reactions, some of which have been reported only rarely.

                In controlled clinical trials, the incidence of adverse reactions to indomethacin extended-release capsules and equal 24-hour doses of indomethacin capsules were similar.

                 *Reactions occurring in 3% to 9% of patients treated with indomethacin. (Those reactions occurring in less than 3% of the patients are unmarked.)

                Causal Relationship Unknown:

                A rare occurrence of fulminant necrotizing fasciitis, particularly in association with Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus, has been described in persons treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, including indomethacin, sometimes with fatal outcome (see also ).

                Cardiovascular:

                Hematologic:

                Genitourinary:

                Incidence greater than 1%Incidence less than 1%
                Gastrointestinal
                Central Nervous System
                Special Senses
                TinnitusOcular-corneal deposits and retinal disturbances, including those of the macula, have been reported in some patients on prolonged therapy with indomethacin
                Cardiovascular
                NoneCongestive heart failure
                Metabolic
                None
                Integumentary
                None
                Hematologic
                None
                Hypersensitivity
                None
                Genitourinary
                NoneBUN elevation
                Miscellaneous
                NoneEpistaxis



                What should I look out for while using Indomethacin extended-release?

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to indomethacin.

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients (see and ).

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see ).


                What might happen if I take too much Indomethacin extended-release?

                The following symptoms may be observed following overdosage: nausea, vomiting, intense headache, dizziness, mental confusion, disorientation or lethargy. There have been reports of paresthesias, numbness and convulsions.

                Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. The stomach should be emptied as quickly as possible if the ingestion is recent. If vomiting has not occurred spontaneously, the patient should be induced to vomit with syrup of ipecac. If the patient is unable to vomit, gastric lavage should be performed. Once the stomach has been emptied, 25 or 50 g of activated charcoal may be given. Depending on the condition of the patient, close medical observation and nursing care may be required. The patient should be followed for several days because gastrointestinal ulceration and hemorrhage have been reported as adverse reactions of indomethacin. Use of antacids may be helpful.

                The oral LD of indomethacin in mice and rats (based on 14 day mortality response) was 50 and 12 mg/kg, respectively.


                How should I store and handle Indomethacin extended-release?

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg is supplied as green and clear capsules, imprinted 720.They are supplied by as follows:Storage: Indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg is supplied as green and clear capsules, imprinted 720.They are supplied by as follows:Storage: Indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg is supplied as green and clear capsules, imprinted 720.They are supplied by as follows:Storage:


                &times

                Clinical Information

                Chemical Structure

                No Image found
                Clinical Pharmacology

                Indomethacin is a nonsteroidal drug with anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties. Its mode of action, like that of other anti-inflammatory drugs, is not known. However, its therapeutic action is not due to pituitary-adrenal stimulation.

                Indomethacin is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis Concentrations are reached during therapy which have been demonstrated to have an effect as well. Prostaglandins sensitize afferent nerves and potentiate the action of bradykinin in inducing pain in animal models. Moreover, prostaglandins are known to be among the mediators of inflammation. Since indomethacin is an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, its mode of action may be due to a decrease of prostaglandins in peripheral tissues.

                Indomethacin has been shown to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, appropriate for long-term use in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis.

                Indomethacin affords relief of symptoms; it does not alter the progressive course of the underlying disease.

                Indomethacin suppresses inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as demonstrated by relief of pain and reduction of fever, swelling and tenderness. Improvement in patients treated with indomethacin for rheumatoid arthritis has been demonstrated by a reduction in joint swelling, average number of joints involved and morning stiffness; by increased mobility as demonstrated by a decrease in walking time; and by improved functional capability as demonstrated by an increase in grip strength.

                Indomethacin has been reported to diminish basal and CO stimulated cerebral blood flow in healthy volunteers following acute oral and intravenous administration. In one study, after one week of treatment with orally administered indomethacin, this effect on basal cerebral blood flow had disappeared. The clinical significance of this effect has not been established.

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules (75 mg) are designed to release 25 mg of drug initially and the remaining 50 mg over approximately 12 hours (90% of dose absorbed by 12 hours). Plasma concentrations of indomethacin fluctuate less and are more sustained following administration of indomethacin extended-release capsules than following administration of 25 mg indomethacin capsules given at 4 to 6 hour intervals. In multiple-dose comparisons, the mean daily steady state plasma level of indomethacin attained with daily administration of indomethacin extended-release capsules 75 mg was indistinguishable from that following indomethacin 25 mg capsules given at 0, 6 and 12 hours daily. However, there was a significant difference in indomethacin plasma levels between the two dosage regimens especially after 12 hours.

                Controlled clinical studies of safety and efficacy in patients with osteoarthritis have shown that one capsule of indomethacin extended-release was clinically comparable to one 25 mg indomethacin capsule t.i.d.; and in controlled clinical studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, one capsule of indomethacin extended-release taken in the morning and one in the evening were clinically indistinguishable from one 50 mg capsule of indomethacin t.i.d.

                Indomethacin is eliminated via renal excretion, metabolism and biliary excretion. Indomethacin undergoes appreciable enterohepatic circulation. The mean half-life of indomethacin is estimated to be about 4.5 hours. With a typical therapeutic regimen of 25 or 50 mg t.i.d., the steady state plasma concentrations of indomethacin are an average 1.4 times those following the first dose.

                Indomethacin exists in the plasma as the parent drug and its desmethyl, desbenzoyl and desmethyl-desbenzoyl metabolites, all in the unconjugated form. About 60 percent of an oral dosage is recovered in urine as drug and metabolites (26 percent as indomethacin and its glucuronide) and 33 percent is recovered in feces (1.5 percent as indomethacin).

                About 99% of indomethacin is bound to protein in plasma over the expected range of therapeutic plasma concentrations. Indomethacin has been found to cross the blood-brain barrier and the placenta.

                Non-Clinical Toxicology
                Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to indomethacin.

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients (see and ).

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see ).

                Indomethacin extended-release capsules cannot be expected to substitute for corticosteroids or to treat corticosteroid insufficiency. Abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids may lead to disease exacerbation. Patients on prolonged corticosteroid therapy should have their therapy tapered slowly if a decision is made to discontinue corticosteroids.

                The pharmacological activity of indomethacin extended-release capsules in reducing [fever and] inflammation may diminish the utility of these diagnostic signs in detecting complications of presumed noninfectious, painful conditions.

                The adverse reactions for indomethacin capsules listed in the following table have been arranged into two groups: 1) incidence greater than 1% and (2) incidence less than 1%. The incidence for group (1) was obtained from 33 double-blind controlled clinical trials reported in the literature (1,092 patients). The incidence for group (2) was based on reports in clinical trials, in the literature and on voluntary reports since marketing. The probability of a causal relationship exists between indomethacin and these adverse reactions, some of which have been reported only rarely.

                In controlled clinical trials, the incidence of adverse reactions to indomethacin extended-release capsules and equal 24-hour doses of indomethacin capsules were similar.

                 *Reactions occurring in 3% to 9% of patients treated with indomethacin. (Those reactions occurring in less than 3% of the patients are unmarked.)

                Causal Relationship Unknown:

                A rare occurrence of fulminant necrotizing fasciitis, particularly in association with Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus, has been described in persons treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, including indomethacin, sometimes with fatal outcome (see also ).

                Cardiovascular:

                Hematologic:

                Genitourinary:

                &times

                Reference

                This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
                "https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

                While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

                &times

                Review

                Rate this treatment and share your opinion


                Helpful tips to write a good review:

                1. Only share your first hand experience as a consumer or a care giver.
                2. Describe your experience in the Comments area including the benefits, side effects and how it has worked for you. Do not provide personal information like email addresses or telephone numbers.
                3. Fill in the optional information to help other users benefit from your review.

                Reason for Taking This Treatment

                (required)

                Click the stars to rate this treatment

                This medication has worked for me.




                This medication has been easy for me to use.




                Overall, I have been satisfied with my experience.




                Write a brief description of your experience with this treatment:

                2000 characters remaining

                Optional Information

                Help others benefit from your review by filling in the information below.
                I am a:
                Gender:
                &times

                Professional

                Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
                &times

                Tips

                Tips

                &times

                Interactions

                Interactions

                A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).