Disclaimer:

Medidex is not a provider of medical services and all information is provided for the convenience of the user. No medical decisions should be made based on the information provided on this website without first consulting a licensed healthcare provider.This website is intended for persons 18 years or older. No person under 18 should consult this website without the permission of a parent or guardian.

ASCORBIC ACID

&times

Overview

What is Ascorbic Acid?

Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C) is a water-soluble vitamin. It occurs as a white or slightly yellow crystal or powder with a light acidic taste. It is an antiscorbutic product. On exposure to air and light it gradually darkens. In the dry state it is reasonably stable in air, but in solution it rapidly oxidizes. Ascorbic Acid is freely soluble in water; sparingly soluble in alcohol; insoluble in chloroform, ether, and benzene. The chemical name of Ascorbic Acid is L-ascorbic acid. The molecular formula is C H 0 and the molecular weight is 176.13.

The structural formula is as follows:

Ascorbic Acid injection is a clear, colorless to slightly yellow sterile solution of Ascorbic Acid in Water for Injection, for intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous use. Each mL contains: Ascorbic Acid 500 mg, Disodium Edetate 0.25 mg, Sodium Hydroxide 110 mg, in Water for Injection q.s. pH (range 5.5 to 7.0) adjusted with Sodium Bicarbonate and Sodium Hydroxide. Contains no preservatives.



What does Ascorbic Acid look like?



What are the available doses of Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Ascorbic Acid?

Ascorbic acid is recommended for the prevention and treatment of scurvy. Its parenteral administration is desirable for patients with an acute deficiency or for those whose absorption of orally ingested ascorbic acid is uncertain.

Symptoms of mild deficiency may include faulty bone and tooth development, gingivitis, bleeding gums, and loosened teeth. Febrile states, chronic illness, and infection (pneumonia, whooping cough, tuberculosis, diphtheria, sinusitis, rheumatic fever, etc.) increases the need for ascorbic acid.

Hemovascular disorders, burns, delayed fracture and wound healing are indications for an increase in the daily intake.

Ascorbic acid is usually administered orally. When oral administration is not feasible or when malabsorption is suspected, the drug may be administered intramuscularly, intravenously or subcutaneously. When given parenterally, utilization of the vitamin reportedly is best after IM administration, which is the preferred parenteral route.

For intravenous injection, dilution into a large volume parenteral such as Normal Saline or Glucose is recommended to minimize the adverse reactions associated with intravenous injection.

The average protective dose of ascorbic acid for adults is 70 to 150 mg daily. In the presence of scurvy, doses of 300 mg to 1 gram daily are recommended. However, as much as 6 grams have been administered parenterally to normal adults without evidence of toxicity.

To enhance wound-healing, doses of 300 to 500 mg daily for a week to ten days, both preoperatively and postoperatively, are generally considered adequate, although considerably larger amounts have been recommended. In the treatment of burns, doses are governed by the extent of tissue injury. For severe burns, daily doses of 1 to 2 grams are recommended. In other conditions in which the need for ascorbic acid is increased, three to five times the daily optimum allowances appear to be adequate.


What interacts with Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No Records found


What are the warnings of Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No Records found


What are the precautions of Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No Records found


What are the side effects of Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No records found


What should I look out for while using Ascorbic Acid?

There are no contraindications to the administration of ascorbic acid.

PRESSURE MAY DEVELOP WITHIN THE VIAL UPON STORAGE.

Exercise care when withdrawing and/or relieve pressure by first inserting sterile empty syringe into vial thus allowing pressure to equilibrate.

When using dispensing vials use aseptic technique. Dispense entire contents in aliquots under a laminar flow hood without delay or within 4 hours after entry or discard remaining content after first withdrawal. Prepare stoppers with a suitable antiseptic solution. Do not use unless solution is clear and seal is intact.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever the solution and container permit.


What might happen if I take too much Ascorbic Acid?

Sorry No Records found


How should I store and handle Ascorbic Acid?

Ascorbic Acid for Injection, USP (500 mg/mL)NDC 0389-0486-1050 mL Sterile Dispensing Vial, packaged in boxes of 10 vials, RX onlyPROTECT FROM LIGHT. STORE IN CARTON UNTIL TIME OF USERev. 04/15Ascorbic Acid for Injection, USP (500 mg/mL)NDC 0389-0486-1050 mL Sterile Dispensing Vial, packaged in boxes of 10 vials, RX onlyPROTECT FROM LIGHT. STORE IN CARTON UNTIL TIME OF USERev. 04/15Ascorbic Acid for Injection, USP (500 mg/mL)NDC 0389-0486-1050 mL Sterile Dispensing Vial, packaged in boxes of 10 vials, RX onlyPROTECT FROM LIGHT. STORE IN CARTON UNTIL TIME OF USERev. 04/15Ascorbic Acid for Injection, USP (500 mg/mL)NDC 0389-0486-1050 mL Sterile Dispensing Vial, packaged in boxes of 10 vials, RX onlyPROTECT FROM LIGHT. STORE IN CARTON UNTIL TIME OF USERev. 04/15Ascorbic Acid for Injection, USP (500 mg/mL)NDC 0389-0486-1050 mL Sterile Dispensing Vial, packaged in boxes of 10 vials, RX onlyPROTECT FROM LIGHT. STORE IN CARTON UNTIL TIME OF USERev. 04/15


&times

Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

In humans, an exogenous source of ascorbic acid is required for collagen formulation and tissue repair. Ascorbic acid is reversibly oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid in the body. These two forms of the vitamin are believed to be important in oxidation-reduction reactions. The vitamin is involved in tyrosine metabolism, conversion of folic acid to folinic acid, carbohydrate metabolism, synthesis of lipids and proteins, iron metabolism, resistance to infections, and cellular respiration.

Ascorbic acid deficiency results in scurvy. Collagenous structures are primarily affected, lesions develop in bones and blood vessels. Administration of ascorbic acid completely reverses the symptoms of ascorbic acid deficiency.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
There are no contraindications to the administration of ascorbic acid.

PRESSURE MAY DEVELOP WITHIN THE VIAL UPON STORAGE.

Exercise care when withdrawing and/or relieve pressure by first inserting sterile empty syringe into vial thus allowing pressure to equilibrate.

When using dispensing vials use aseptic technique. Dispense entire contents in aliquots under a laminar flow hood without delay or within 4 hours after entry or discard remaining content after first withdrawal. Prepare stoppers with a suitable antiseptic solution. Do not use unless solution is clear and seal is intact.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever the solution and container permit.

ACE-inhibitors

Reports suggest that NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of ACE-inhibitors. This interaction should be given consideration in patients taking NSAIDs concomitantly with ACE-inhibitors.

Aspirin

When ibuprofen tablets are administered with aspirin, its protein binding is reduced, although the clearance of free ibuprofen tablets is not altered. The clinical significance of this interaction is not known; however, as with other NSAIDs, concomitant administration of ibuprofen and aspirin is not generally recommended because of the potential for increased adverse effects.

Diuretics

Clinical studies, as well as post marketing observations, have shown that ibuprofen tablets can reduce the natriuretic effect-of furosemide and thiazides in some patients. This response has been attributed to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. During concomitant therapy with NSAIDs, the patient should be observed closely for signs of renal failure (see ), as well as to assure diuretic efficacy.

Lithium

Ibuprofen produced an elevation of plasma lithium levels and a reduction in renal lithium clearance in a study of eleven normal volunteers. The mean minimum lithium concentration increased 15% and the renal clearance of lithium was decreased by 19% during this period of concomitant drug administration. This effect has been attributed to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis by ibuprofen. Thus, when ibuprofen and lithium are administered concurrently, subjects should be observed carefully for signs of lithium toxicity. (Read circulars for lithium preparation before use of such concurrent therapy.)

Methotrexate

NSAIDs have been reported to competitively inhibit methotrexate accumulation in rabbit kidney slices. This may indicate that they could enhance the toxicity of methotrexate. Caution should be used when NSAIDs are administered concomitantly with methotrexate.

Warfarin-type anticoagulants

Several short-term controlled studies failed to show that ibuprofen tablets significantly affected prothrombin times or a variety of other clotting factors when administered to individuals on coumarin-type anticoagulants. However, because bleeding has been reported when ibuprofen tablets and other NSAIDs have been administered to patients on coumarin-type anticoagulants, the physician should be cautious when administering ibuprofen tablets to patients on anticoagulants. The effects of warfarin and NSAIDs on GI bleeding are synergistic, such that the users of both drugs together have a risk of serious GI bleeding higher than users of either drug alone.

H-2 Antagonists

In studies with human volunteers, co-administration of cimetidine or ranitidine with ibuprofen had no substantive effect on ibuprofen serum concentrations.

General Precautions

Laboratory Tests

Drug Interactions

Usage in Pregnancy

Nursing Mothers

Transient mild soreness may occur at the site of intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. Too-rapid intravenous administration of the solution may cause temporary faintness or dizziness.

&times

Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

&times

Review

Rate this treatment and share your opinion


Helpful tips to write a good review:

  1. Only share your first hand experience as a consumer or a care giver.
  2. Describe your experience in the Comments area including the benefits, side effects and how it has worked for you. Do not provide personal information like email addresses or telephone numbers.
  3. Fill in the optional information to help other users benefit from your review.

Reason for Taking This Treatment

(required)

Click the stars to rate this treatment

This medication has worked for me.




This medication has been easy for me to use.




Overall, I have been satisfied with my experience.




Write a brief description of your experience with this treatment:

2000 characters remaining

Optional Information

Help others benefit from your review by filling in the information below.
I am a:
Gender:
&times

Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
&times

Tips

Tips

&times

Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).