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Chestnut

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Overview

What is Chestnut?

Allergenic extracts are sterile solutions consisting of the extractable components from various biological sources including pollens, inhalants, molds, animal epidermals and insects. Aqueous extracts are prepared using cocas fluid containing NaCl 0.5%, NaHCO3 0.0275%, WFI, preservative 0.4% Phenol. Glycerinated allergenic extracts are prepared with cocas fluid and glycerin to produce a 50% (v/v) allergenic extract. Allergenic Extracts are supplied as concentrations designated as protein nitrogen units (PNU) or weight/volume (w/v) ratio. Standardized extracts are designated in Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU) or Allergy Units (AU).

For diagnostic purposes, allergenic extracts are to be administered by prick-puncture or intradermal routes. Allergenic extracts are administered subcutaneously for immunotherapy injections.



What does Chestnut look like?



What are the available doses of Chestnut?

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What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Chestnut?

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How should I use Chestnut?

Allergenic extracts are indicated for use in diagnostic testing and as part of a treatment regime for allergic disease, as established by allergy history and skin test reactivity.

Allergenic extracts are indicated for the treatment of allergen specific allergic disease for use as hyposensitization or immunotherapy when avoidance of specific allergens can not be attained. The use of allergenic extracts for therapeutic purpose has been established by well-controlled clinical studies. Allergenic extracts may be used as adjunctive therapy along with pharmacotherapy which includes antihistamines, corticosteroids, and cromoglycate, and avoidance measures. Allergenic extracts for therapeutic use should be given using only the allergen selection to which the patient is allergic, has a history of exposure and are likely to be exposed to again.

General Precautions

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permits.

The dosage of allergenic extracts is dependent upon the purpose of the administration. Allergenic extracts can be administered for diagnostic use or for therapeutic use.

When allergenic extracts are administered for diagnostic use, the dosage is dependent upon the method used. Two methods commonly used are scratch testing and intradermal testing. Both types of tests result in a wheal and flare response at the site of the test which usually develops rapidly and may be read in 20-30 minutes.

: Scratch Testing Method

Scratch testing is considered a simple and safe method although less sensitive than the intradermal test. Scratch testing can be used to determine the degree of sensitivity to a suspected allergen before using the intradermal test. This combination lessens the severity of response to an allergen which can occur in a very sensitive patient.

The most satisfactory testing site is the patient's back or volar surface of the arms from the axilla to 2.5 or 5cm above the wrist, skipping the anti-cubital space. If using the back as a testing site, the most satisfactory area are from the posterior axillary fold to 2.5 cm from the spinal column, and from the top of the scapula to the lower rib margins.

Allergenic extracts for diagnostic use are to be administered in the following manner: To scratch surface of skin, use a circular scarifier. Tests sites should be 4 cm apart to allow for wheal and flare reaction. 1-30 scratch tests may be done at a time. A separate sterile scratch instrument is to be used on each patient to prevent transmission of homologous serum hepatitis or other infectious agents from one patient to another.

The recommended usual dosage for Scratch testing is one drop of allergen applied to each scratch site. Always apply a control scratch with each test set. Sterile Diluent (for a negative control) is used in exactly the same way as an active test extract. Histamine may be used as a positive control. Scratch or prick test sites should be examined at 15 and 30 minutes. To prevent excessive absorption, wipe off antigens producing large reactions as soon as the wheal appears. Record the size of the reaction.

Interpretation of Scratch Test

Skin tests are graded in terms of the wheal and erythema response noted at 10 to 20 minutes. Wheal and erythema size may be recorded by actual measurement as compared with positive and negative controls. A positive reaction consists of an area of erythema surrounding the scarification that is larger than the control site. For uniformity in reporting reactions, the following system is recommended.

Intradermal Skin Testing Method

Do not perform intradermal test with allergens which have evoked a 2+ or greater response to a Scratch test. Clean test area with alcohol, place sites 5 cm apart using separate sterile tuberculin syringe and a 25 gauge needle for each allergen. Insert needle tip, bevel up, into intracutaneous space. Avoid injecting into blood vessel, pull back gently on syringe plunger, if blood enters syringe change position of needle. The recommended dosage and range for intradermal testing is 0.05 ml of not more than 100 pnu/ml or 1:1000 w/v (only if puncture test is negative) of allergenic extract. Inject slowly until a small bleb is raised. It is important to make each bleb the same size.

Interpretation of Intradermal Test:

The patient's reaction is graded on the basis of size of wheal and flare as compared to control. Use 0.05 ml sterile diluent as a negative control to give accurate interpretation. The tests may be accurately interpreted only when the saline control site has shown a negative response. Observe patient for at least 30 minutes. Tests can be read in 15-20 minutes. Edema, erythema and presence of pseudopods, pain and itching may be observed in 4 plus reactions. For uniformity in reporting reactions the following system is recommended.

Therapeutic Use: Recommended dosage & range

Check the listed ingredients to verify that it matches the prescription ordered. When using a prescription set, verify the patient's name and the ingredients listed with the prescription order. Assess the patient's physical and emotional status prior to giving as injection. Do not give injections to patients who are in acute distress.

Dosage of allergenic extracts is a highly individualized matter and varies according to the degree of sensitivity of the patient, his clinical response and tolerance to the extract administered during the early phases of an injection regimen. The dosage must be reduced when transferring a patient from non-standardized or modified extract to standardized extract. Any evidence of a local or generalized reaction requires a reduction in dosage during the initial stages of immunotherapy as well as during maintenance therapy. After therapeutic injections patients should be observed for at least 20 minutes for reaction symptoms.

SUGGESTED DOSAGE SCHEDULE

The following schedule may act as a guide. Sensitive patients may begin with smaller doses of weaker solutions and the dosage increments can be less.

Preparation Instructions:

All dilutions may be made using sterile buffered diluent. The calculation may be based on the following ratio:

Volume desired x Concentration desired = Volume needed x Concentration available.

Example 1

Vd x Cd = Vn x Ca

10ml x 0.001 = Vn x 0.1

0.1 ml = Vn

Using a sterile technique, remove 0.10 ml of extract from the 1:10 vial and place it into a vial containing 9.90 ml of sterile diluent. The resulting ratio will be a 10 ml vial of 1:1,000 w/v.

Example 2

10ml x 100 = Vn x 10,000

0.1 ml = Vn

Using a sterile technique, remove 0.10 ml of extract from the 10,000 pnu/ml vial and place it into a vial containing 9.90 ml of sterile diluent. The resulting concentration will be a 10 ml vial of 100 pnu/ml.

Example 3:

10ml x 100 = Vn x 10,000

0.1 ml = Vn

Using a sterile technique, remove 0.10 ml of extract from the 10,000 AU/ml or BAU/ml vial and place it into a vial containing 9.90 ml of sterile diluent. The resulting concentration will be 10ml vial of 100 AU/ml or BAU/ml.

Intervals between doses:

1. PRESEASONAL

Treatment starts each year 6 to 8 weeks before onset of seasonal symptoms. Maximal dose reached just before symptoms are expected. Injections discontinued during and following season until next year.

2. CO-SEASONAL

Patient is first treated during season with symptoms. Low initial doses are employed to prevent worsening of condition. This is followed by an intensive schedule of therapy (i.e. injections given 2 to 3 times per week). Fewer Allergists are resorting to this Co-seasonal therapy because of the availability of more effective, symptomatic medications that allow the patient to go through a season relatively symptom free.

3. PERENNIAL

Initially this is the same as pre seasonal. The allergen is administered twice weekly or weekly for about 20 injections to achieve the maximum tolerated dose. Then, maintenance therapy may be administered once a week or less frequently.

Duration of Treatment:


What interacts with Chestnut?

Allergenic extracts should not be used if the patient has asthma, cardiovascular disease, emphysema, diabetes, bleeding diathesis or pregnancy, unless a specific diagnosis of type 1 allergic disease is made based on skin testing and the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks of an adverse reaction during testing or treatment. Allergenic extracts are not indicated for use in patients who are not clinically allergic or who are not skin reactive to an allergen. Allergenic extracts should be discontinued or the concentration of potency substantially reduced in patients who experience unacceptable adverse reactions.



What are the warnings of Chestnut?

Concentrated extracts must be diluted with sterile diluent prior to first use on a patient for treatment or intradermal testing. All concentrates of glycerinated allergenic extracts have the ability to cause serious local and systemic reactions including death in sensitive patients. Sensitive patients may experience severe anaphylactic reactions resulting in respiratory obstruction, shock, coma and /or death. An allergenic extract should be temporarily withheld from patients or the dose of the extract adjusted downward if any of the following conditions exist: (1) Severe symptoms of rhinitis and/or asthma (2) Infections or flu accompanied by fever and (3) Exposure to excessive amounts of clinically relevant allergen prior to a scheduled injection. When switching patients to a new lot of the same extract the initial dose should be reduced 3/4 so that 25% of previous dose is administered.

DO NOT INJECT INTRAVENOUSLY.

Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available.

Concentrated extracts must be diluted with sterile diluent prior to first use on a patient for treatment or intradermal testing. All concentrates of glycerinated allergenic extracts have the ability to cause serious local and systemic reactions including death in sensitive patients. Sensitive patients may experience severe anaphylactic reactions resulting in respiratory obstruction, shock, coma and /or death. An allergenic extract should be temporarily withheld from patients or the dose of the extract adjusted downward if any of the following conditions exist: (1) Severe symptoms of rhinitis and/or asthma (2) Infections or flu accompanied by fever and (3) Exposure to excessive amounts of clinically relevant allergen prior to a scheduled injection. When switching patients to a new lot of the same extract the initial dose should be reduced 3/4 so that 25% of previous dose is administered.


What are the precautions of Chestnut?

GENERAL: Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available as well as personnel trained in administering emergency treatment.

Standardized extracts are those labeled in AU/ml units or BAU/ml units. Standardized extracts are not interchangeable with extracts previously labeled as wt/vol or PNU/ml. Before administering a standardized extract, read the accompanying insert contained with standardized extracts.

Information for Patients:

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Extreme caution should be taken when using allergenic extracts on patients who are taking beta-blockers. Patients on non-selective beta blockers may be more reactive to allergens given for testing or treatment and may be unresponsive to the usual doses of epinephrine used to treat allergic reactions.

Carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility:

Long term studies in animals have not been conducted with allergenic extracts to determine their potential carcinogenicity, mutagenicity or impairment of fertility.

Pregnancy: Category C:

Nursing Mothers:

Pediatric Use:


What are the side effects of Chestnut?

Adverse systemic reactions usually occur within minutes and consist primarily of allergic symptoms such as: generalized skin erythema, urticaria, pruritus, angioedema, rhinitis, wheezing, laryngeal edema, itching of nose and throat, breathlessness, dyspnea, coughing, hypotension and marked perspiration. Less commonly, nausea, emesis, abdominal cramps, diarrhea and uterine contractions may occur. Severe reactions may cause anaphylaxis or shock and loss of consciousness and rarely death.

The treatment of systemic allergic reactions is dependent upon the system complex. Antihistamines may offer relief of recurrent urticaria, associated skin reactions and gastrointestinal symptoms. Corticosteroids may provide benefit if symptoms are prolonged or recurrent.

Local Reactions consisting of erythema, itching, swelling tenderness and sometimes pain may occur at the injection site. These reactions may appear within a few minutes to hours and persist for several days. Local cold applications and oral antihistamines may be effective treatment. For marked and prolonged local reactions the use of antihistamines or anti-inflammatory medications may be dictated. should be reported to Nelco Laboratories immediately and a report can be filed to:


What should I look out for while using Chestnut?

Allergenic extracts should not be used if the patient has asthma, cardiovascular disease, emphysema, diabetes, bleeding diathesis or pregnancy, unless a specific diagnosis of type 1 allergic disease is made based on skin testing and the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks of an adverse reaction during testing or treatment. Allergenic extracts are not indicated for use in patients who are not clinically allergic or who are not skin reactive to an allergen. Allergenic extracts should be discontinued or the concentration of potency substantially reduced in patients who experience unacceptable adverse reactions.

DO NOT INJECT INTRAVENOUSLY.

Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available.

Concentrated extracts must be diluted with sterile diluent prior to first use on a patient for treatment or intradermal testing. All concentrates of glycerinated allergenic extracts have the ability to cause serious local and systemic reactions including death in sensitive patients. Sensitive patients may experience severe anaphylactic reactions resulting in respiratory obstruction, shock, coma and /or death. An allergenic extract should be temporarily withheld from patients or the dose of the extract adjusted downward if any of the following conditions exist: (1) Severe symptoms of rhinitis and/or asthma (2) Infections or flu accompanied by fever and (3) Exposure to excessive amounts of clinically relevant allergen prior to a scheduled injection. When switching patients to a new lot of the same extract the initial dose should be reduced 3/4 so that 25% of previous dose is administered.


What might happen if I take too much Chestnut?

Overdose can cause both local and systemic reactions. An overdose may be prevented by careful observation and questioning of the patient about the previous injection.

If systemic or anaphylactic reaction, does occur, apply a tourniquet above the site of injection and inject intramuscularly or subcutaneously 0.3 to 0.5ml of 1:1000 Epinephrine Hydrochloride into the opposite arm. The dose may be repeated in 5-10 minutes if necessary. Loosen the tourniquet at least every 10 minutes. The Epinephrine Hydrochloride 1:1000 dose for infants to 2 years is 0.05 to 0.1 ml, for children 2 to 6 years it is 0.15 ml, for children 6-12 years it is 0.2 ml.

Patients unresponsive to Epinephrine may be treated with Theophylline. Studies on asthmatic subjects reveal that plasma concentrations of Theophylline of 5 to 20 µg/ml are associated with therapeutic effects. Toxicity is particularly apparent at concentrations greater than 20 µg/ml. A loading dose of Aminophylline of 5.8 mg/kg intravenously followed by 0.9 mg/kg per hour results in plasma concentrations of approximately 10 µg/ml for patients not previously receiving theophylline. (Mitenko and Ogilive, Nicholoson and Chick,1973)

Other beta-adrenergic drugs such as Isoproterenol, Isoetharine, or Albuterol may be used by inhalation. The usual dose to relieve broncho-constriction in asthma is 0.5 ml of the 0.5% solution for Isoproterenol HCl. The Albuterol inhaler delivers approximately 90 mcg of Albuterol from the mouthpiece. The usual dosage for adults and children would be two inhalations repeated every 4-6 hours. Isoetharine supplied in the Bronkometer unit delivers approximately 340 mcg Isoetharine. The average dose is one to two inhalations. Respiratory obstruction not responding to parenteral or inhaled bronchodilators may require oxygen, intubation and the use of life support systems.


How should I store and handle Chestnut?

Store at controlled room temperature 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP] .Allergenic extracts are supplied with units listed as: Weight/volume (W/V), Protein Nitrogen Units (PNU/ml), Allergy Units (AU/ml) or Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU/ml). Sizes:Diagnostic Scratch: 5 ml dropper application vialsDiagnostic Intradermal: 5 ml or 10 ml vials.Therapeutic Allergens: 5 ml, 10 ml, 50 ml multiple dose vials.Allergenic extracts are supplied with units listed as: Weight/volume (W/V), Protein Nitrogen Units (PNU/ml), Allergy Units (AU/ml) or Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU/ml). Sizes:Diagnostic Scratch: 5 ml dropper application vialsDiagnostic Intradermal: 5 ml or 10 ml vials.Therapeutic Allergens: 5 ml, 10 ml, 50 ml multiple dose vials.Allergenic extracts are supplied with units listed as: Weight/volume (W/V), Protein Nitrogen Units (PNU/ml), Allergy Units (AU/ml) or Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU/ml). Sizes:Diagnostic Scratch: 5 ml dropper application vialsDiagnostic Intradermal: 5 ml or 10 ml vials.Therapeutic Allergens: 5 ml, 10 ml, 50 ml multiple dose vials.Allergenic extracts are supplied with units listed as: Weight/volume (W/V), Protein Nitrogen Units (PNU/ml), Allergy Units (AU/ml) or Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU/ml). Sizes:Diagnostic Scratch: 5 ml dropper application vialsDiagnostic Intradermal: 5 ml or 10 ml vials.Therapeutic Allergens: 5 ml, 10 ml, 50 ml multiple dose vials.Allergenic extracts are supplied with units listed as: Weight/volume (W/V), Protein Nitrogen Units (PNU/ml), Allergy Units (AU/ml) or Bioequivalent Allergy Units (BAU/ml). Sizes:Diagnostic Scratch: 5 ml dropper application vialsDiagnostic Intradermal: 5 ml or 10 ml vials.Therapeutic Allergens: 5 ml, 10 ml, 50 ml multiple dose vials.


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

The pharmacological action of allergenic extracts used diagnostically is based on the liberation of histamine and other substances when the allergen reacts with IgE antibodies attached to the mast cells. When allergenic extracts are used for immunotherapy, the effect is an increase in immunoglobulin G (IgG) and an increased T suppresser lymphocyte which interferes with the allergic response. With repeated administration of allergenic extracts changes develop in regards to IgG and IgE production and mediator-releasing cells. The histamine release response is reduced in some patients.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Allergenic extracts should not be used if the patient has asthma, cardiovascular disease, emphysema, diabetes, bleeding diathesis or pregnancy, unless a specific diagnosis of type 1 allergic disease is made based on skin testing and the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks of an adverse reaction during testing or treatment. Allergenic extracts are not indicated for use in patients who are not clinically allergic or who are not skin reactive to an allergen. Allergenic extracts should be discontinued or the concentration of potency substantially reduced in patients who experience unacceptable adverse reactions.

DO NOT INJECT INTRAVENOUSLY.

Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available.

Concentrated extracts must be diluted with sterile diluent prior to first use on a patient for treatment or intradermal testing. All concentrates of glycerinated allergenic extracts have the ability to cause serious local and systemic reactions including death in sensitive patients. Sensitive patients may experience severe anaphylactic reactions resulting in respiratory obstruction, shock, coma and /or death. An allergenic extract should be temporarily withheld from patients or the dose of the extract adjusted downward if any of the following conditions exist: (1) Severe symptoms of rhinitis and/or asthma (2) Infections or flu accompanied by fever and (3) Exposure to excessive amounts of clinically relevant allergen prior to a scheduled injection. When switching patients to a new lot of the same extract the initial dose should be reduced 3/4 so that 25% of previous dose is administered.

Drug Interactions

CNS-Active Drugs

Imipramine: Coadministration of single doses of zaleplon 20 mg and imipramine 75 mg produced additive effects on decreased alertness and impaired psychomotor performance for 2 to 4 hours after administration. The interaction was pharmacodynamic with no alteration of the pharmacokinetics of either drug.

Paroxetine: Coadministration of a single dose of zaleplon 20 mg and paroxetine 20 mg daily for 7 days did not produce any interaction on psychomotor performance. Additionally, paroxetine did not alter the pharmacokinetics of zaleplon, reflecting the absence of a role of CYP2D6 in zaleplon's metabolism.

Thioridazine: Coadministration of single doses of zaleplon 20 mg and thioridazine 50 mg produced additive effects on decreased alertness and impaired psychomotor performance for 2 to 4 hours after administration. The interaction was pharmacodynamic with no alteration of the pharmacokinetics of either drug.

Venlafaxine: Coadministration of a single dose of zaleplon 10 mg and multiple doses of venlafaxine ER (extended release) 150 mg did not result in any significant changes in the pharmacokinetics of either zaleplon of venlafaxine. In addition, there was no pharmacodynamic interaction as a result of coadministration of zaleplon and venlafaxine ER.

Promethazine: Coadministration of a single dose of zaleplon and promethazine (10 and 25 mg, respectively) resulted in a 15% decrease in maximal plasma concentrations of zaleplon, but no change in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve. however, the pharmacodynamics of coadministration of zaleplon and promethazine have not been evaluated. Caution should be exercised when these 2 agents are coadministered.

Drugs That Induce CYP3A4Rifampin: CYP3A4 is ordinarily a minor metabolizing enzyme of zaleplon. Multiple-dose administration of the potent CYP3A4 inducer rifampin (600 mg every 24 hours, q24h, for 14 days), however, reduced zaleplon C and AUC by approximately 80%. The coadministration of a potent CYP3A4 enzyme inducer, although not posing a safety concern, thus could lead to ineffectiveness of zaleplon. An alternative non-CYP3A4 substrate hypnotic agent may be considered in patients taking CYP3A4 inducers such as rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital.

Drugs That Inhibit CYP3A4CYP3A4 is a minor metabolic pathway for the elimination of zaleplon because the sum of desethylzaleplon (formed via CYP3A4 in vitro) and its metabolites, 5-oxo-desethylzaleplon and 5-oxo-desethylzaleplon glucuronide, account for only 9% of the urinary recovery of a zaleplon dose. Coadministration of single, oral doses of zaleplon with erythromycin (10 mg and 800 mg respectively), a strong, selective CYP3A4 inhibitor, produced a 34% increase in zaleplon's maximal plasma concentrations and a 20% increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve. The magnitude of interaction with multiple doses of erythromycin is unknown. Other strong selective CYP3A4 inhibitors such as ketoconazole can also be expected to increase the exposure of zaleplon. A routine dosage adjustment of zaleplon is not considered necessary.

Drugs That Inhibit Aldehyde Oxidase

The aldehyde oxidase enzyme system is less well studied than the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. Diphenhydramine: Diphenhydramine is reported to be a weak inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase in rat liver, but its inhibitory effects in human liver are not known. There is no pharmacokinetic interaction between zaleplon and diphenhydramine following the administration of a single dose (10 mg and 50 mg, respectively) of each drug. However, because both of these compounds have CNS effects, an additive pharmacodynamic effect is possible.

Drugs That Inhibit Both Aldehyde Oxidase and CYP3A4

Cimetidine: Cimetidine inhibits both aldehyde oxidase (in vitro) and CYP3A4 (in vitro and in vivo), the primary and secondary enzymes, respectively, responsible for zaleplon metabolism. Concomitant administration of zaleplon (10 mg) and cimetidine (800 mg) produced an 85% increase in the mean Cmax and AUC of zaleplon. An initial dose of 5 mg should be given to patients who are concomitantly being treated with cimetidine (see ).

Drugs Highly Bound to Plasma Protein

Zaleplon is not highly bound to plasma proteins (fraction bound 60%±15%); therefore, the disposition of zaleplon is not expected to be sensitive to alterations in protein binding. In addition, administration of zaleplon to a patient taking another drug that is highly protein bound should not cause transient increase in free concentrations of the other drug.

Drugs with a Narrow Therapeutic Index Digoxin: zaleplon (10 mg) did not affect the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic profile of digoxin (0.375 mg q24h for 8 days).Warfarin: Multiple oral doses of zaleplon (20 mg q24h for 13 days) did not affect the pharmacokinetics of warfarin (R+)- or (S-)-enantiomers or the pharmacodynamics (prothrombin time) following a single 25-mg oral dose of warfarin.

Drugs That Alter Renal ExcretionIbuprofen: Ibuprofen is known to affect renal function and, consequently, alter the renal excretion of other drugs. There was no apparent pharmacokinetic interaction between zaleplon and ibuprofen following single dose administration (10 mg and 600 mg, respectively) of each drug. This was expected because zaleplon is primarily metabolized and renal excretion of unchanged zaleplon accounts for less than 1% of the administered dose.

GENERAL: Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available as well as personnel trained in administering emergency treatment.

Standardized extracts are those labeled in AU/ml units or BAU/ml units. Standardized extracts are not interchangeable with extracts previously labeled as wt/vol or PNU/ml. Before administering a standardized extract, read the accompanying insert contained with standardized extracts.

Information for Patients:

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Extreme caution should be taken when using allergenic extracts on patients who are taking beta-blockers. Patients on non-selective beta blockers may be more reactive to allergens given for testing or treatment and may be unresponsive to the usual doses of epinephrine used to treat allergic reactions.

Carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility:

Long term studies in animals have not been conducted with allergenic extracts to determine their potential carcinogenicity, mutagenicity or impairment of fertility.

Pregnancy: Category C:

Nursing Mothers:

Pediatric Use:

Adverse systemic reactions usually occur within minutes and consist primarily of allergic symptoms such as: generalized skin erythema, urticaria, pruritus, angioedema, rhinitis, wheezing, laryngeal edema, itching of nose and throat, breathlessness, dyspnea, coughing, hypotension and marked perspiration. Less commonly, nausea, emesis, abdominal cramps, diarrhea and uterine contractions may occur. Severe reactions may cause anaphylaxis or shock and loss of consciousness and rarely death.

The treatment of systemic allergic reactions is dependent upon the system complex. Antihistamines may offer relief of recurrent urticaria, associated skin reactions and gastrointestinal symptoms. Corticosteroids may provide benefit if symptoms are prolonged or recurrent.

Local Reactions consisting of erythema, itching, swelling tenderness and sometimes pain may occur at the injection site. These reactions may appear within a few minutes to hours and persist for several days. Local cold applications and oral antihistamines may be effective treatment. For marked and prolonged local reactions the use of antihistamines or anti-inflammatory medications may be dictated. should be reported to Nelco Laboratories immediately and a report can be filed to:

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Interactions

Interactions

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