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Dextrose

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Overview

What is Dextrose?

50% Dextrose Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic, hypertonic solution of dextrose in water for injection for intravenous injection as a fluid and nutrient replenisher. Each mL of fluid contains 0.5 g dextrose, hydrous which delivers 3.4 kcal/gram. The solution has an osmolarity of 2.53 mOsmol/mL (calc.), a pH of 4.2 (3.2 to 6.5) and may contain sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid for pH adjustment. The solution contains no bacteriostat, antimicrobial agent or added buffer (except for pH adjustment) and is intended only for use as a single-dose injection. When smaller doses are required, the unused portion should be discarded with the entire unit. Dextrose, USP is chemically designated C6H12O6• H2O (D-glucose monohydrate), a hexose sugar freely soluble in water. Dextrose, hydrous has the following structural formula:

Water for Injection, USP is chemically designated H2O .The syringe is molded from a specially formulated polypropylene. Water permeates from inside the container at an extremely slow rate which will have an insignificant effect on solution concentration over the expected shelf life. Solutions in contact with the plastic container may leach out certain chemical components from the plastic in very small amounts; however, biological testing was supportive of the safety of the syringe material.



What does Dextrose look like?



What are the available doses of Dextrose?

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What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Dextrose?

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How should I use Dextrose?

50% Dextrose Injection is indicated in the treatment of insulin hypoglycemia (hyperinsulinemia or insulin shock) to restore blood glucose levels. The solution is also indicated, after dilution, for intravenous infusion as a source of carbohydrate calories in patients whose oral intake is restricted or inadequate to maintain nutritional requirements. Slow infusion of hypertonic solutions is essential to insure proper utilization of dextrose and avoid production of hyperglycemia.

For peripheral vein administration:

slowly

For central venous administration:


What interacts with Dextrose?

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What are the warnings of Dextrose?

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What are the precautions of Dextrose?

Sorry No Records found


What are the side effects of Dextrose?

Sorry No records found


What should I look out for while using Dextrose?

A concentrated dextrose solution should not be used when intracranial or intraspinal hemorrhage is present, nor in the presence of delirium tremens if the patient is already dehydrated. Dextrose injection without electrolytes should not be administered simultaneously with blood through the same infusion set because of the possibility that pseudoagglutination of red cells may occur.

50% Dextrose Injection is hypertonic and may cause phlebitis and thrombosis at the site of injection. Significant hyperglycemia and possible hyperosmolar syndrome may result from too rapid administration. The physician should be aware of the symptoms of hyperosmolar syndrome, such as mental confusion and loss of consciousness, especially in patients with chronic uremia and those with known carbohydrate intolerance. The intravenous administration of this solution can cause fluid and/or solute overloading resulting in dilution of serum electrolyte concentrations, overhydration, congested states or pulmonary edema. Additives may be incompatible. Consult with pharmacist if available. When introducing additives, use aseptic technique, mix thoroughly and do not store.

For peripheral vein administration:

For central venous administration:


What might happen if I take too much Dextrose?

In the event of overhydration or solute overload during therapy, re-evaluate the patient and institute appropriate corrective measures. See WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS.


How should I store and handle Dextrose?

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep tightly closed (protect from moisture). Protect from light. 50% Dextrose Injection, USP is supplied in single-dose containers as follows:


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

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Clinical Pharmacology

When administered intravenously this solution restores blood glucose levels in hypoglycemia and provides a source of carbohydrate calories. Carbohydrate in the form of dextrose may aid in minimizing liver glycogen depletion and exerts a protein-sparing action. Dextrose injection undergoes oxidation to carbon dioxide and water. Water is an essential constituent of all body tissues and accounts for approximately 70% of total body weight. Average normal adult requirement ranges from two to three liters (1.0 to 1.5 liters each for insensible water loss by perspiration and urine production). Water balance is maintained by various regulatory mechanisms. Water distribution depends primarily on the concentration of electrolytes in the body compartments and sodium (Na+) plays a major role in maintaining physiologic equilibrium.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
A concentrated dextrose solution should not be used when intracranial or intraspinal hemorrhage is present, nor in the presence of delirium tremens if the patient is already dehydrated. Dextrose injection without electrolytes should not be administered simultaneously with blood through the same infusion set because of the possibility that pseudoagglutination of red cells may occur.

50% Dextrose Injection is hypertonic and may cause phlebitis and thrombosis at the site of injection. Significant hyperglycemia and possible hyperosmolar syndrome may result from too rapid administration. The physician should be aware of the symptoms of hyperosmolar syndrome, such as mental confusion and loss of consciousness, especially in patients with chronic uremia and those with known carbohydrate intolerance. The intravenous administration of this solution can cause fluid and/or solute overloading resulting in dilution of serum electrolyte concentrations, overhydration, congested states or pulmonary edema. Additives may be incompatible. Consult with pharmacist if available. When introducing additives, use aseptic technique, mix thoroughly and do not store.

For peripheral vein administration:

For central venous administration:

Nifedipine is mainly eliminated by metabolism and is a substrate of CYP3A. Inhibitors and inducers of CYP3A can impact the exposure to nifedipine and consequently its desirable and undesirable effects. and data indicate that nifedipine can inhibit the metabolism of drugs that are substrates of CYP3A, thereby increasing the exposure to other drugs. Nifedipine is a vasodilator, and coadministration of other drugs affecting blood pressure may result in pharmacodynamic interactions.

Do not use unless the solution is clear and seal is intact. Discard unused portion. Electrolyte deficits, particularly in serum potassium and phosphate, may occur during prolonged use of concentrated dextrose solutions. Blood electrolyte monitoring is essential and fluid and electrolyte imbalances should be corrected. Essential vitamins and minerals also should be provided as needed. To minimize hyperglycemia and consequent glycosuria, it is desirable to monitor blood and urine glucose and if necessary, add insulin. When a concentrated dextrose infusion is abruptly withdrawn, it is advisable to follow with the administration of 5% or 10% dextrose injection to avoid rebound hypoglycemia. Solutions containing dextrose should be used with caution in patients with known subclinical or overt diabetes mellitus. Care should be exercised to insure that the needle is well within the lumen of the vein and that extravasation does not occur. If thrombosis should occur during administration, the injection should be stopped and corrective measures instituted. Concentrated dextrose solutions should not be administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility:

Pregnancy Category C.

Nursing Mothers

Hyperosmolar syndrome, resulting from excessively rapid administration of concentrated dextrose may cause mental confusion and/or loss of consciousness. Reactions which may occur because of the solution or the technique of administration include febrile response, infection at the site of injection, venous thrombosis or phlebitis extending from the site of injection, extravasation and hypervolemia. If an adverse reaction does occur, discontinue the infusion, evaluate the patient, institute appropriate therapeutic countermeasures and save the remainder of the fluid for examination if deemed necessary.

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Tips

Tips

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Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).