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Dog Hair

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Overview

What is Dog Hair?

Antigen Laboratories’ allergenic extracts are manufactured from source material listed on the vial label. Lower concentrations (e.g. 1:50, 1:33, etc.) may be prepared either by dilution from a more concentrated stock or by direct extraction. The extract is a sterile solution containing extractables of source materials obtained from biological collecting and/or processing firms and Antigen Laboratories. All source materials are inspected by Antigen Laboratories’ technical personnel in accordance with 21 CFR 680.1 (b) (1). The route of administration for immunotherapy is subcutaneous. The routes of administration for diagnostic purposes are intradermal or prick-puncture of the skin.

FOR ALLERGENIC EXTRACTS CONTAINING 50% V/V GLYCERINE AS PRESERVATIVE AND STABILIZER:

INACTIVE INGREDIENTS:

Sodium chloride…………………………………………………………….0.95%

Sodium bicarbonate………………………………………………………..0.24%

Glycerine…………………………………………………………………50% (v/v)

Water for Injection…………………………………………………q.s. to volume

Active allergens are described by common and scientific name on the stock concentrate container label or on last page of this circular.

Food allergenic extracts may be manufactured on a weight/volume (w/v) or volume/volume (v/v) basis. Food extracts made from dried raw material are extracted at 2-10% (1:50-1:10 w/v ratio) in extracting fluid containing 50% glycerine. Slurries of juicy fruits or vegetables (prepared with a minimum amount of water for injection) are combined with an equal volume of glycerine for a ration of 1:1 volume/volume (v/v). Sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate are added to the slurry and glycerine mixture. Fresh egg white extract is prepared by adding one part raw egg white to nine parts of extracting fluid (1:9 v/v).

Antigen E is considered the most important allergen of Short Ragweed pollen and is used for the standardization of Short Ragweed allergenic extracts. Stock mixtures containing Short Ragweed are analyzed for Antigen E content by radial immunodiffusion using Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) references and anti-serum. Antigen E content expressed as units of Antigen E per milliliter (U/ml) is printed on container label.



What does Dog Hair look like?



What are the available doses of Dog Hair?

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What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Dog Hair?

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How should I use Dog Hair?

Allergenic extract is used for diagnostic testing and for the treatment (immunotherapy) of patients whose histories indicate that upon natural exposure to the allergen, they experience allergic symptoms. Confirmation is determined by skin testing. Diagnostic use of allergenic extracts usually begins with direct skin testing. This product is not intended for treatment of patients who do not manifest immediate hypersensitivity reactions to the allergenic extract following skin testing.

Refer to “STORAGE” section for proper storage condition for allergenic extract. Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. Some allergenic extracts naturally precipitate.

Physicians undertaking immunotherapy should be concerned with patient’s degree of sensitivity. The initial dilution of allergenic extract, starting dose, and progression of dosage must be carefully determined on the basis of the patient’s history and results of skin tests. Strongly positive skin tests may be risk factors for systemic reactions. Less aggressive immunotherapy schedules may be indicated for such patients.

Precaution is necessary when using extract mixture for skin testing. The diluting effect of individual components within a mixture may cause false negative reactions. Patients extremely sensitive to a common allergen in several components of a mixture may be more likely to experience a systemic reaction than when skin tested individually for each component.

PRICK-PUNCTURE TESTING:

A positive control using histamine phosphate identifies patients whose skin may not react due to medications, metabolic or other reasons. A negative control (50% glycerine for prick-puncture testing) would exclude false-positive reactions due to ingredients in diluent or patients who have dermatographism.

SINGLE DILUTION INTRADERMAL TESTING:

INTRADERMAL TESTING-SKIN ENDPOINT TITRATION:

Injections should never be given intravenously. A 5/8 inch, 25 gauge needle on a sterile syringe will allow deep subcutaneous injection.

IMMUNOTHERAPY:

physician must proceed cautiously in the treatment of the highly sensitive patient who develops large local or systemic reactions.

Some patients may tolerate larger doses of the allergenic extract depending on patient response. Because diluted extract tends to lose activity in storage, the first dose from a more concentrated vial should be the same, or less than, the previous dose.

Dosages progressively increase according to the tolerance of the patient at intervals of one to seven days until, (1) the patient achieves relief from symptoms, (2) induration at the site of injection is no larger than 50 mm in 36 to 48 hours, (3) a maintenance dose is reached (the largest dose tolerated by the patient that relieves symptoms without undesirable local or systemic reactions). This maintenance dose may be continued at regular intervals perennially. It may be necessary to adjust the progression of dosage downward to avoid local and constitutional reactions.

The usual duration of treatment has not been established. A period of two or three years on immunotherapy constitutes an average minimum course of treatment.


What interacts with Dog Hair?

Do not administer in the presence of diseases characterized by bleeding diathesis. Individuals with autoimmune disease may be at risk of exacerbating symptoms of the underlying disease, possibly due to routine immunization. Patients who have experienced a recent myocardial infarction may not be tolerant of immunotherapy. Children with nephrotic syndrome probably should not receive injections due to immunization causing exacerbation of nephrotic disease.



What are the warnings of Dog Hair?

Extract should be temporarily withheld or dosage reduced in case of any of the following conditions: 1) flu or other infection with fever; 2) exposure to excessive amounts of allergen prior to injection; 3) rhinitis and/or asthma exhibiting severe symptoms; 4) adverse reaction to previous injection until cause of reaction has been evaluated by physician supervising patient’s immunotherapy program.

Refer to boxed “WARNINGS”, “PRECAUTIONS”, “ADVERSE REACTIONS” and “OVERDOSAGE” sections for additional information on serious adverse reactions and steps to be taken, if any occur.

Extreme caution is necessary when using diagnostic skin tests or injection treatment in highly sensitive patients who have experienced severe symptoms or anaphylaxis by natural exposure, or during previous skin testing or treatment.

Benefit versus risk needs to be evaluated in steroid dependent asthmatics, patients with unstable asthma or patients with underlying cardiovascular disease.

Injections should never be given intravenously. A 5/8 inch, 25 gauge needle on a sterile syringe allows deep subcutaneous injection. Withdraw plunger slightly after inserting needle to determine if a blood vessel has been entered.

Proper measurement of dose and caution in making injection will minimize reactions. Adverse reactions to allergenic extracts are usually apparent within 20-30 minutes following injection of immunotherapy.

Extract should be temporarily withheld or dosage reduced in case of any of the following conditions: 1) flu or other infection with fever; 2) exposure to excessive amounts of allergen prior to injection; 3) rhinitis and/or asthma exhibiting severe symptoms; 4) adverse reaction to previous injection until cause of reaction has been evaluated by physician supervising patient’s immunotherapy program.


What are the precautions of Dog Hair?

General:

Immunotherapy must be given under physician’s supervision. Sterile solutions, vials, syringes, etc. must be used. Aseptic technique must be observed in making dilutions from stock concentrates. The usual precautions in administering allergenic extracts are necessary, refer to boxed WARNINGS and “WARNINGS” section. Sterile syringe and needle must be used for each individual patient to prevent transmission of serum hepatitis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other infectious agents.

Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available. Refer to “OVERDOSAGE” section for description of treatment for anaphylactic reactions.

Information for Patients:

Patient should remain under observation of a nurse, physician, or personnel trained in emergency measures for at least 20 minutes following immunotherapy injection. Patient must be instructed to report any adverse reactions that occur within 24 hours after injection. Possible adverse reactions include unusual swelling and/or tenderness at injection site, rhinorrhea, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, or faintness. Immediate medical attention must be sought for reactions that occur during or after leaving physician’s office.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility:

Long term studies in animals have not been conducted with allergenic extract to determine their potential for carcinogenicity, mutagenicity or impairment of fertility.

Pregnancy Category C:

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with allergenic extracts. It is not known whether allergenic extracts cause fetal harm during pregnancy or affect reproductive capacity. A systemic reaction to allergenic extract could cause uterine contractions leading to spontaneous abortion or premature labor. Allergenic extracts should be used during pregnancy only if potential benefit justifies potential risk to fetus.

Nursing Mothers:

It is not known whether allergenic extracts are excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when allergenic extracts are administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use:

Allergenic extracts have been used routinely in children, and no special safety problems or specific hazards have been found. Children can receive the same dose as adults. Discomfort is minimized by dividing the dose in half and administering injection at two different sites.

Drug Interactions:

Antihistamines.

Imipramines, phenothiazines, and tranquilizers.

Corticosteroids.

Theophylline.

Beta-Blockers.

Beta-adrenergic agents.

Cromolyn.

Other drugs.

Specific Immunotherapy.


What are the side effects of Dog Hair?

Adverse reactions include, but are not limited to urticaria; itching; edema of extremities; respiratory wheezing or asthma; dyspnea; cyanosis; tachycardia; lacrimation; marked perspiration; flushing of face, neck or upper chest; mild persistent clearing of throat; hacking cough or persistent sneezing.

1) Local Reactions

A mild burning immediately after injection is expected; this usually subsides in 10-20 seconds. Prolonged pain or pain radiating up arm is usually the result of intramuscular injection, making this injection route undesirable. Subcutaneous injection is the recommended route.

Small amounts of erythema and swelling at the site of injection are common. Reactions should not be considered significant unless they persist for at least 24 hours or exceed 50 mm in diameter.

Larger local reactions are not only uncomfortable, but indicate the possibility of a severe systemic reaction if dosage is increased. In such cases dosage should be reduced to the last level not causing reaction and maintained for two or three treatments before cautiously increasing.

Large, persistent local reactions or minor exacerbations of the patient’s allergic symptoms may be treated by local cold applications and/or use of oral antihistamines.

2) Systemic Reactions

Systemic reactions range from mild exaggeration of patient’s allergic symptoms to anaphylactic reactions. Very sensitive patients may show a rapid response. It cannot be overemphasized that, under certain unpredictable combinations of circumstances, anaphylactic shock is always a possibility. Fatalities are rare but can occur. Other possible systemic reaction symptoms are fainting, pallor, bradycardia, hypotension, angioedema, cough, wheezing, conjunctivitis, rhinitis,and urticaria.

Careful attention to dosage and administration limit such reactions. Allergenic extracts are highly potent to sensitive individuals and OVERDOSE could result in anaphylactic symptoms. Therefore, it is imperative that physicians administering allergenic extracts understand and prepare for treatment of severe reactions. Refer to “OVERDOSAGE” section.


What should I look out for while using Dog Hair?

Do not administer in the presence of diseases characterized by bleeding diathesis. Individuals with autoimmune disease may be at risk of exacerbating symptoms of the underlying disease, possibly due to routine immunization. Patients who have experienced a recent myocardial infarction may not be tolerant of immunotherapy. Children with nephrotic syndrome probably should not receive injections due to immunization causing exacerbation of nephrotic disease.

Refer to boxed “WARNINGS”, “PRECAUTIONS”, “ADVERSE REACTIONS” and “OVERDOSAGE” sections for additional information on serious adverse reactions and steps to be taken, if any occur.

Extreme caution is necessary when using diagnostic skin tests or injection treatment in highly sensitive patients who have experienced severe symptoms or anaphylaxis by natural exposure, or during previous skin testing or treatment.

Benefit versus risk needs to be evaluated in steroid dependent asthmatics, patients with unstable asthma or patients with underlying cardiovascular disease.

Injections should never be given intravenously. A 5/8 inch, 25 gauge needle on a sterile syringe allows deep subcutaneous injection. Withdraw plunger slightly after inserting needle to determine if a blood vessel has been entered.

Proper measurement of dose and caution in making injection will minimize reactions. Adverse reactions to allergenic extracts are usually apparent within 20-30 minutes following injection of immunotherapy.

Extract should be temporarily withheld or dosage reduced in case of any of the following conditions: 1) flu or other infection with fever; 2) exposure to excessive amounts of allergen prior to injection; 3) rhinitis and/or asthma exhibiting severe symptoms; 4) adverse reaction to previous injection until cause of reaction has been evaluated by physician supervising patient’s immunotherapy program.


What might happen if I take too much Dog Hair?

Refer to “WARNINGS”, “PRECAUTIONS” and “ADVERSE REACTIONS” sections for signs and symptoms of an overdose.

If a systemic or anaphylactic reaction does occur, apply tourniquet above the site of allergenic extract injection and inject intramuscularly or subcutaneously 0.3 to 0.5 ml of 1:1000 Epinephrine-hydrochloride into the opposite arm or gluteal area. Repeat dose in 5-10 minutes if necessary. Loosen tourniquet briefly at 5 minute intervals to prevent circulatory impairment. Discontinue use of the tourniquet after ½ hour.

The epinephrine HCL 1:1000 dose for infants to 2 years is 0.05 to 0.1 ml; for children 2 to 6 years it is 0.15 ml; for children 6 to 12 years it is 0.2 ml.

Symptoms of progressive anaphylaxis include airway obstruction and/or vascular collapse. After administration of epinephrine, profound shock and vasomotor collapse should be treated with intravenous fluids and possibly vasoactive drugs. Monitor airways for obstruction. Oxygen should be given by mask if indicated.

Antihistamines, H antagonist, bronchodilators, steroids and theophylline may be used as indicated after providing adequate epinephrine and circulatory support.

Patients who have been taking beta-blockers may be unresponsive to epinephrine. Epinephrine or beta-adrenergic drugs (Alupent) may be ineffective. These drugs should be administered even though a beta-blocker may have been taken. The following treatment will be effective whether or not patient is taking a beta-blocker: Aminophylline IV, slow push or drip, Atrovent (Ipratropium bromide) Inhaler, 3 inhalations repeated, Atropine, 0.4 mg/ml, 0.75 to 1.5 ml IM or IV, Solu-Cortef, 100-200 mg IM or IV, Solu-Medrol, 125 mg IM or IV, Glucagon, 0.5-1 mg IM or IV, Benadryl, 50 mg IM or IV, Cimetidine, 300 mg IM or IV, Oxygen via ambu bag.


How should I store and handle Dog Hair?

Store at controlled room temperature 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP] . Stock concentrates are available in concentrations of 2-10% or weight/volume (w/v) of 1:50, 1:33, 1:20 or 1:10. Some juicy or liquid foods are available at 1:1 volume/volume (v/v) extraction ratio. Fresh egg white extract is available at 1:9 v/v extraction ratio. Antigen E content of ragweed mixtures ranges from 46-166 U/ml for Ragweed Mixture (Short/Giant/Western/Southern Ragweed), 47-239 U/ml for Short/Giant/Western Ragweed Mixture, and 106-256 U/ml for Short/Giant Ragweed Mixture. Refer to container label for actual Antigen E content. Extract (stock concentrate) is supplied in 10, 30 and 50 ml containers. Extracts in 5 ml dropper bottles are available for prick-puncture testing. To insure maximum potency for the entire dating period, all stock concentrates contain 50% glycerine v/v. Stock concentrates are available in concentrations of 2-10% or weight/volume (w/v) of 1:50, 1:33, 1:20 or 1:10. Some juicy or liquid foods are available at 1:1 volume/volume (v/v) extraction ratio. Fresh egg white extract is available at 1:9 v/v extraction ratio. Antigen E content of ragweed mixtures ranges from 46-166 U/ml for Ragweed Mixture (Short/Giant/Western/Southern Ragweed), 47-239 U/ml for Short/Giant/Western Ragweed Mixture, and 106-256 U/ml for Short/Giant Ragweed Mixture. Refer to container label for actual Antigen E content. Extract (stock concentrate) is supplied in 10, 30 and 50 ml containers. Extracts in 5 ml dropper bottles are available for prick-puncture testing. To insure maximum potency for the entire dating period, all stock concentrates contain 50% glycerine v/v. Stock concentrates are available in concentrations of 2-10% or weight/volume (w/v) of 1:50, 1:33, 1:20 or 1:10. Some juicy or liquid foods are available at 1:1 volume/volume (v/v) extraction ratio. Fresh egg white extract is available at 1:9 v/v extraction ratio. Antigen E content of ragweed mixtures ranges from 46-166 U/ml for Ragweed Mixture (Short/Giant/Western/Southern Ragweed), 47-239 U/ml for Short/Giant/Western Ragweed Mixture, and 106-256 U/ml for Short/Giant Ragweed Mixture. Refer to container label for actual Antigen E content. Extract (stock concentrate) is supplied in 10, 30 and 50 ml containers. Extracts in 5 ml dropper bottles are available for prick-puncture testing. To insure maximum potency for the entire dating period, all stock concentrates contain 50% glycerine v/v.


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

Studies indicate allergic individuals produce immunoglobulins of the IgE class in response to exposure to allergens. Subsequent exposure to the allergen results in a combination of allergen with IgE antibody fixed on mast cells or basophil membranes. This cross-linking results in stimulation of mast cell which leads to release and generation of pharmacologically active substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity reaction.

The mode of action of immunotherapy with allergenic extracts is still under investigation. Subcutaneous injections of increasing doses of allergenic extract into patients with allergic disease have been shown to result in both humoral and cellular changes including the production of allergen-specific IgG antibodies, the suppression of histamine release from target cells, decrease in circulating levels of antigen specific IgE antibody over long periods of time and suppression of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte cell responses to antigen.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Do not administer in the presence of diseases characterized by bleeding diathesis. Individuals with autoimmune disease may be at risk of exacerbating symptoms of the underlying disease, possibly due to routine immunization. Patients who have experienced a recent myocardial infarction may not be tolerant of immunotherapy. Children with nephrotic syndrome probably should not receive injections due to immunization causing exacerbation of nephrotic disease.

Refer to boxed “WARNINGS”, “PRECAUTIONS”, “ADVERSE REACTIONS” and “OVERDOSAGE” sections for additional information on serious adverse reactions and steps to be taken, if any occur.

Extreme caution is necessary when using diagnostic skin tests or injection treatment in highly sensitive patients who have experienced severe symptoms or anaphylaxis by natural exposure, or during previous skin testing or treatment.

Benefit versus risk needs to be evaluated in steroid dependent asthmatics, patients with unstable asthma or patients with underlying cardiovascular disease.

Injections should never be given intravenously. A 5/8 inch, 25 gauge needle on a sterile syringe allows deep subcutaneous injection. Withdraw plunger slightly after inserting needle to determine if a blood vessel has been entered.

Proper measurement of dose and caution in making injection will minimize reactions. Adverse reactions to allergenic extracts are usually apparent within 20-30 minutes following injection of immunotherapy.

Extract should be temporarily withheld or dosage reduced in case of any of the following conditions: 1) flu or other infection with fever; 2) exposure to excessive amounts of allergen prior to injection; 3) rhinitis and/or asthma exhibiting severe symptoms; 4) adverse reaction to previous injection until cause of reaction has been evaluated by physician supervising patient’s immunotherapy program.

General:

Immunotherapy must be given under physician’s supervision. Sterile solutions, vials, syringes, etc. must be used. Aseptic technique must be observed in making dilutions from stock concentrates. The usual precautions in administering allergenic extracts are necessary, refer to boxed WARNINGS and “WARNINGS” section. Sterile syringe and needle must be used for each individual patient to prevent transmission of serum hepatitis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other infectious agents.

Epinephrine 1:1000 should be available. Refer to “OVERDOSAGE” section for description of treatment for anaphylactic reactions.

Information for Patients:

Patient should remain under observation of a nurse, physician, or personnel trained in emergency measures for at least 20 minutes following immunotherapy injection. Patient must be instructed to report any adverse reactions that occur within 24 hours after injection. Possible adverse reactions include unusual swelling and/or tenderness at injection site, rhinorrhea, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, or faintness. Immediate medical attention must be sought for reactions that occur during or after leaving physician’s office.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility:

Long term studies in animals have not been conducted with allergenic extract to determine their potential for carcinogenicity, mutagenicity or impairment of fertility.

Pregnancy Category C:

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with allergenic extracts. It is not known whether allergenic extracts cause fetal harm during pregnancy or affect reproductive capacity. A systemic reaction to allergenic extract could cause uterine contractions leading to spontaneous abortion or premature labor. Allergenic extracts should be used during pregnancy only if potential benefit justifies potential risk to fetus.

Nursing Mothers:

It is not known whether allergenic extracts are excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when allergenic extracts are administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use:

Allergenic extracts have been used routinely in children, and no special safety problems or specific hazards have been found. Children can receive the same dose as adults. Discomfort is minimized by dividing the dose in half and administering injection at two different sites.

Drug Interactions:

Antihistamines.

Imipramines, phenothiazines, and tranquilizers.

Corticosteroids.

Theophylline.

Beta-Blockers.

Beta-adrenergic agents.

Cromolyn.

Other drugs.

Specific Immunotherapy.

Adverse reactions include, but are not limited to urticaria; itching; edema of extremities; respiratory wheezing or asthma; dyspnea; cyanosis; tachycardia; lacrimation; marked perspiration; flushing of face, neck or upper chest; mild persistent clearing of throat; hacking cough or persistent sneezing.

1) Local Reactions

A mild burning immediately after injection is expected; this usually subsides in 10-20 seconds. Prolonged pain or pain radiating up arm is usually the result of intramuscular injection, making this injection route undesirable. Subcutaneous injection is the recommended route.

Small amounts of erythema and swelling at the site of injection are common. Reactions should not be considered significant unless they persist for at least 24 hours or exceed 50 mm in diameter.

Larger local reactions are not only uncomfortable, but indicate the possibility of a severe systemic reaction if dosage is increased. In such cases dosage should be reduced to the last level not causing reaction and maintained for two or three treatments before cautiously increasing.

Large, persistent local reactions or minor exacerbations of the patient’s allergic symptoms may be treated by local cold applications and/or use of oral antihistamines.

2) Systemic Reactions

Systemic reactions range from mild exaggeration of patient’s allergic symptoms to anaphylactic reactions. Very sensitive patients may show a rapid response. It cannot be overemphasized that, under certain unpredictable combinations of circumstances, anaphylactic shock is always a possibility. Fatalities are rare but can occur. Other possible systemic reaction symptoms are fainting, pallor, bradycardia, hypotension, angioedema, cough, wheezing, conjunctivitis, rhinitis,and urticaria.

Careful attention to dosage and administration limit such reactions. Allergenic extracts are highly potent to sensitive individuals and OVERDOSE could result in anaphylactic symptoms. Therefore, it is imperative that physicians administering allergenic extracts understand and prepare for treatment of severe reactions. Refer to “OVERDOSAGE” section.

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Interactions

Interactions

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