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Guanidine hydrochloride

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Overview

What is Guanidine hydrochloride?

Chemically, guanidine (aminomethanamidine) hydrochloride is a crystalline powder freely soluble in water and alcohol. The aqueous solution is neutral.

The structural formula is:

Each tablet contains 125 mg of guanidine hydrochloride with no color additive in the base. It also contains the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, mannitol, and microcrystalline cellulose.



What does Guanidine hydrochloride look like?



What are the available doses of Guanidine hydrochloride?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Guanidine hydrochloride?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Guanidine hydrochloride?

Guanidine is indicated for the reduction of the symptoms of muscle weakness and easy fatigability associated with the myasthenic syndrome of Eaton-Lambert. It is not indicated for treating myasthenia gravis. The Eaton-Lambert syndrome is ordinarily differentiated from myasthenia gravis by the usual association of the syndrome with small cell carcinoma of the lung, but myography may be necessary to make the diagnosis.

Initial dosage is usually between 10 and 15 mg/kg (5 to 7 mg/pound) of body weight per day in 3 or 4 divided doses. This dosage may be gradually increased to a total daily dosage of 35 mg/kg (16 mg/pound) of body weight per day or up to the development of side effects. As individual tolerance is highly variable, the dosage must be carefully titrated. Once a tolerable dose has been established, it should be continued. Occasionally removal of the primary neoplastic lesion may result in improvement of symptoms, permitting the discontinuance of guanidine.


What interacts with Guanidine hydrochloride?

Guanidine is contraindicated in individuals with a history of intolerance or allergy to this drug.



What are the warnings of Guanidine hydrochloride?

Fatal bone-marrow suppression, apparently dose related, can occur with guanidine.

Safe use of guanidine hydrochloride in pregnancy has not been established. Therefore, the benefits of therapy must be weighed against the potential hazards. Because guanidine is excreted in milk, patients on this drug should discontinue breastfeeding.

Since there is inadequate experience in children who have received this drug, safety and efficacy in children have not been established.


What are the precautions of Guanidine hydrochloride?

Baseline blood studies should be followed by frequent red and white blood cell and differential counts. The drug should be discontinued upon appearance of bone-marrow suppression. Concurrent therapy with other drugs that may cause bone-marrow suppression should be avoided.

Renal function may be affected in some patients receiving guanidine. Patients should therefore have regular urine examinations and serum creatinine determinations while taking this drug.

Physicians should be given adequate precautions pertaining to the gastrointestinal side effects and the possibility of induced behavior disorders.

Treatment should not be continued longer than necessary.


What are the side effects of Guanidine hydrochloride?

Anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia resulting from bone-marrow suppression attributable to guanidine have been reported. Other adverse reactions that have been observed are:

General:

Neurologic:

Gastrointestinal:

Dermatologic:

Renal:

Hepatic:

Cardiac:


What should I look out for while using Guanidine hydrochloride?

Guanidine is contraindicated in individuals with a history of intolerance or allergy to this drug.

Fatal bone-marrow suppression, apparently dose related, can occur with guanidine.

Safe use of guanidine hydrochloride in pregnancy has not been established. Therefore, the benefits of therapy must be weighed against the potential hazards. Because guanidine is excreted in milk, patients on this drug should discontinue breastfeeding.

Since there is inadequate experience in children who have received this drug, safety and efficacy in children have not been established.


What might happen if I take too much Guanidine hydrochloride?

Mild gastrointestinal disorders, such as anorexia, increased peristalsis, or diarrhea are early warnings that tolerance is being exceeded. These symptoms may be relieved by atropine, but nevertheless note should be taken of these symptoms and dosage reductions considered. Slight numbness or tingling of the lips and fingertips shortly after taking a dose of guanidine has been reported. This per se is not an indication to discontinue treatment and/or reduce dosage.

Severe guanidine intoxication is characterized by nervous hyperirritability, fibrillary tremors and convulsive contractions of muscle, salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, hypoglycemia, and circulatory disturbances. Administration of intravenous calcium gluconate may control the neuromuscular and convulsive symptoms and provide some relief of other toxic manifestations.

Atropine is more effective than calcium in relieving the G.I. symptoms, circulatory disturbances, and changes in blood sugar.


How should I store and handle Guanidine hydrochloride?

Store at 25°C (77ºF); excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].Guanidine hydrochloride tablets: 125 mg, white, round tablet; impressed with the product identification number "KEY 74" on one side. Guanidine hydrochloride tablets are available in bottles of 100 (NDC 0085-0492-01).


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

Guanidine apparently acts by enhancing the release of acetylcholine following a nerve impulse. It also appears to slow the rates of depolarization and repolarization of muscle cell membranes.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Guanidine is contraindicated in individuals with a history of intolerance or allergy to this drug.

Fatal bone-marrow suppression, apparently dose related, can occur with guanidine.

Safe use of guanidine hydrochloride in pregnancy has not been established. Therefore, the benefits of therapy must be weighed against the potential hazards. Because guanidine is excreted in milk, patients on this drug should discontinue breastfeeding.

Since there is inadequate experience in children who have received this drug, safety and efficacy in children have not been established.

Specific drug interaction studies have not been conducted with ofloxacin otic solution.

Baseline blood studies should be followed by frequent red and white blood cell and differential counts. The drug should be discontinued upon appearance of bone-marrow suppression. Concurrent therapy with other drugs that may cause bone-marrow suppression should be avoided.

Renal function may be affected in some patients receiving guanidine. Patients should therefore have regular urine examinations and serum creatinine determinations while taking this drug.

Physicians should be given adequate precautions pertaining to the gastrointestinal side effects and the possibility of induced behavior disorders.

Treatment should not be continued longer than necessary.

Anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia resulting from bone-marrow suppression attributable to guanidine have been reported. Other adverse reactions that have been observed are:

General:

Neurologic:

Gastrointestinal:

Dermatologic:

Renal:

Hepatic:

Cardiac:

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Tips

Tips

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Interactions

Interactions

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