Disclaimer:

Medidex is not a provider of medical services and all information is provided for the convenience of the user. No medical decisions should be made based on the information provided on this website without first consulting a licensed healthcare provider.This website is intended for persons 18 years or older. No person under 18 should consult this website without the permission of a parent or guardian.

CITRIC ACID MONOHYDRATE, TRISODIUM CITRATE DIHYDRATE, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC, MONOHYDRATE, ANHYDROUS DEXTROSE

&times

Overview

What is Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?



What does Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D) look like?



What are the available doses of Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

The container for all CP2D and AS-3 solutions is a flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bag sized for holding the appropriate amount of solution. The bag has a single port that is used for bag filling. The port is sealed after filling with a male luer assembly (CP2D) or female luer assembly (AS-3). Both the male and female luers are gamma irradiated prior to use. The plastic bag is contained in an overwrap which is added prior to sterilization.

The formulations for these products are as follows:

Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)

Additive Solution 3 (AS-3)

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

The Haemonetics 250mL Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose (CP2D) and 250mL Additive Solution Formula 3 (AS-3) nutrient solution are intended to be used only with automated apheresis devices for collecting human blood and blood components. The anticoagulant solution is metered by the apheresis machine into the collected whole blood. It is not to be infused directly into the donor. After the anticoagulant is used, the bag in which it was contained is discarded. When collecting plasma in the RBCP protocol, the plasma is collected into an empty plasma collection bag. One hundred milliliters (100ml) of AS-3 is transferred into one RBC collection bag when using the RBCP protocol or 2 separate bags when using the 2RBC protocol. AS-3 solution provides nutrients to keep the red blood cells viable for 42 days when refrigerated.

CP2D is also indicated for the collection of FFP and PF24 plasma, collected and stored plasma collected using the 822, 822-2P and 822F-2P disposable sets may be frozen within 8 hours (FFP) or within 24 hours which includes 8 hours room temperature storage and 16 hours refrigeration storage (PF24).

The 300mL AS-3 is used in conjunction with automated red blood cell washing devices. AS-3 serves as the nutrient solution for storage of the red blood cell product after deglycerolization. The red blood cells are washed using the Model 215 System. AS-3 is used for priming the disposable and for the last wash of the red blood cells. The washed cells are then re-suspended in 100mL of the AS-3 before transfer into a product collection bag or storage bag. Additive Solution Formula 3 (AS-3) provides nutrients to keep the washed red blood cells viable for up to 14 days after washing when refrigerated.

Neither the CP2D nor the AS-3 container is used for the storage of blood or blood components.

CP2D Anticoagulant Solution and AS-3 Solution may be used with Haemonetics apheresis devices. See the Haemonetics Operation Manual for full operating instructions.

Prior to use of the solutions, check the solutions for leaks by squeezing each of the bags firmly. If leaks are found, discard the solution.


What interacts with Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Sorry No Records found


What are the warnings of Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Sorry No Records found


What are the precautions of Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Sorry No Records found


What are the side effects of Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Sorry No records found


What should I look out for while using Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?


What might happen if I take too much Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Both solutions are intended to be used only with automated apheresis devices for collecting human blood and blood components. CP2D is used as an anticoagulant solution and AS-3 is intended for use a nutrient solution. Neither solution is intended for direct infusion.


How should I store and handle Haemonetics Anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Double Dextrose Solution (CP2D)?

Unopened vials of gemcitabine for injection, USP are stable until the expiration date indicated on the package when stored at controlled room temperature 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) and that allows for excursions between 15° and 30°C (59° and 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature] [ ] 250mL CP2D Anticoagulant Solution is supplied in flexible PVC containers with a sterile, non-pyrogenic fluid path. 250mL and 300mL AS-3 Nutrient Solution is supplied in flexible PVC containers with a sterile, non-pyrogenic fluid path.


&times

Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

Non-Clinical Toxicology




When corticosteroids are administered concomitantly with potassium-depleting agents (e.g., ), patients should be observed closely for development of hypokalemia. In addition, there have been cases reported in which concomitant use of amphotericin B and hydrocortisone was followed by cardiac enlargement and congestive heart failure.





Macrolide antibiotics have been reported to cause a significant decrease in corticosteroid clearance (see ).





Concomitant use of anticholinesterase agents (e.g., ) and corticosteroids may produce severe weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis. If possible, anticholinesterase agents should be withdrawn at least 24 hours before initiating corticosteroid therapy. If concomitant therapy must occur, it should take place under close supervision and the need for respiratory support should be anticipated.





Coadministration of corticosteroids and usually results in inhibition of response to warfarin, although there have been some conflicting reports. Therefore, coagulation indices should be monitored frequently to maintain the desired anticoagulant effect.





Because corticosteroids may increase blood glucose concentrations, dosage adjustments of antidiabetic agents may be required.





Serum concentrations of may be decreased.





Since systemic steroids, as well as bupropion, can lower the seizure threshold, concurrent administration should be undertaken only with extreme caution; low initial dosing and small gradual increases should be employed.





Cholestyramine may increase the clearance of corticosteroids.





Increased activity of both cyclosporine and corticosteroids may occur when the two are used concurrently. Convulsions have been reported with this concurrent use.





Patients on digitalis glycosides may be at increased risk of arrhythmias due to hypokalemia.





Estrogens may decrease the hepatic metabolism of certain corticosteroids, thereby increasing their effect.





Postmarketing surveillance reports indicate that the risk of tendon rupture may be increased in patients receiving concomitant fluoroquinolones (e.g., ) and corticosteroids, especially in the elderly. Tendon rupture can occur during or after treatment with quinolones.





Drugs which cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) enzyme activity (e.g., ) may enhance the metabolism of corticosteroids and require that the dosage of the corticosteroid be increased. Drugs which CYP 3A4 (e.g., ) have the potential to result in increased plasma concentrations of corticosteroids. Glucocorticoids are moderate inducers of CYP 3A4. Coadministration with other drugs that are metabolized by CYP 3A4 (e.g., ) may increase their clearance, resulting in decreased plasma concentration.





Ketoconazole has been reported to decrease the metabolism of certain corticosteroids by up to 60%, leading to increased risk of corticosteroid side effects. In addition, ketoconazole alone can inhibit adrenal corticosteroid synthesis and may cause adrenal insufficiency during corticosteroid withdrawal.





Concomitant use of (or other ) and corticosteroids increases the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. Aspirin should be used cautiously in conjunction with corticosteroids in hypoprothrombinemia. The clearance of salicylates may be increased with concurrent use of corticosteroids; this could lead to decreased salicylate serum levels or increase the risk of salicylate toxicity when corticosteroid is withdrawn.





In postmarketing experience, there have been reports of both increases and decreases in phenytoin levels with dexamethasone coadministration, leading to alterations in seizure control. Phenytoin has been demonstrated to increase the hepatic metabolism of corticosteroids, resulting in a decreased therapeutic effect of the corticosteroid.





Increased doses of quetiapine may be required to maintain control of symptoms of schizophrenia in patients receiving a glucocorticoid, a hepatic enzyme inducer.





Corticosteroids may suppress reactions to skin tests.





Coadministration with thalidomide should be employed cautiously, as toxic epidermal necrolysis has been reported with concomitant use.





Patients on corticosteroid therapy may exhibit a diminished response to toxoids and live or inactivated vaccines due to inhibition of antibody response. Corticosteroids may also potentiate the replication of some organisms contained in live attenuated vaccines. Routine administration of vaccines or toxoids should be deferred until corticosteroid therapy is discontinued if possible (see ).

Contraindications:

Precautions for use:

Note:

Note:

Donors being reinfused with citrated blood or blood components may experience side effects due to the presence of citrate. Patients being transfused with the blood components could also experience a reaction to the citrated blood components. The major symptom experienced by donors is paraesthesia. Should this occur the reinfusion should be stopped or the reinfusion rate decreased. In the event of inadvertent bolus of the product administer calcium gluconate.

&times

Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

&times

Review

Rate this treatment and share your opinion


Helpful tips to write a good review:

  1. Only share your first hand experience as a consumer or a care giver.
  2. Describe your experience in the Comments area including the benefits, side effects and how it has worked for you. Do not provide personal information like email addresses or telephone numbers.
  3. Fill in the optional information to help other users benefit from your review.

Reason for Taking This Treatment

(required)

Click the stars to rate this treatment

This medication has worked for me.




This medication has been easy for me to use.




Overall, I have been satisfied with my experience.




Write a brief description of your experience with this treatment:

2000 characters remaining

Optional Information

Help others benefit from your review by filling in the information below.
I am a:
Gender:
&times

Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
&times

Tips

Tips

&times

Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).