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Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide

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Overview

What is Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide combines an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril and a diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide.

Lisinopril, a synthetic peptide derivative, is an oral long-acting angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. It is chemically described as (S)-1-[ -(1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl)L-lysyl]-L-proline dihydrate. Its empirical formula is CHN0•2H0 and its structural formula is:

Lisinopril is a white to off-white, crystalline powder, with a molecular weight of 441.52. It is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in methanol, and practically insoluble in ethanol.

Hydrochlorothiazide is 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide. Its empirical formula is CHCIN0S and its structural formula is:

Hydrochlorothiazide is a white, or practically white, crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 297.73, which is slightly soluble in water, but freely soluble in sodium hydroxide solution.

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is available for oral use in three tablet combinations of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide: 10-12.5 mg containing 10 mg lisinopril and 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide, lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide: 20-12.5 mg containing 20 mg lisinopril and 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide and lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide: 20-25 mg containing 20 mg lisinopril and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide.

Inactive ingredients are as follows:

10/12.5 mg:

20/12.5 mg:

20/25 mg:



What does Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide look like?



What are the available doses of Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is indicated for the treatment of hypertension. These fixed-dose combinations are not indicated for initial therapy (see ).

In using lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide, consideration should be given to the fact that an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, has caused agranulocytosis, particularly in patients with renal impairment or collagen vascular disease, and that available data are insufficient to show that lisinopril does not have a similar risk. (See .)

In considering use of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide it should be noted that black patients receiving ACE inhibitors have been reported to have a higher incidence of angioedema compared to non-blacks. (See )

Lisinopril is an effective treatment of hypertension in once-daily doses of 10-80 mg, while hydrochlorothiazide is effective in doses of 12.5-50 mg. In clinical trials of lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy using lisinopril doses of 10-80 mg and hydrochlorothiazide doses of 6.25-50 mg, the antihypertensive response rates generally increased with increasing dose of either component.

The side effects (see ) of lisinopril are generally rare and apparently independent of dose; those of hydrochlorothiazide are a mixture of dose-dependent phenomena (primarily hypokalemia) and dose-independent phenomena (e.g., pancreatitis), the former much more common than the latter. Therapy with any combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide will be associated with both sets of dose-independent side effects, but addition of lisinopril in clinical trials blunted the hypokalemia normally seen with diuretics.

To minimize dose-independent side effects, it is usually appropriate to begin combination therapy only after a patient has failed to achieve the desired effect with monotherapy.


What interacts with Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to any component of this product and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and in patients with hereditary or idiopathic angioedema. Because of the hydrochlorothiazide component, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.



What are the warnings of Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

General

Lisinopril

Anaphylactoid and Possibly Related Reactions:

Presumably because angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors affect the metabolism of eicosanoids and polypeptides, including endogenous bradykinin, patients receiving ACE inhibitors (including lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide) may be subject to a variety of adverse reactions, some of them serious.

Angioedema:

Where there involvement of the tongue, glottis or Iarynx, likely to cause airway obstruction, subcutaneous epinephrine solution 1:1000 (0.3 mL to 0.5 mL) and/or measures necessary to ensure a patent airway, should be promptly provided.

Patients with a history of angioedema unrelated to ACE inhibitor therapy may at increased risk of angioedema while receiving an ACE inhibitor (see also and ).

Anaphylactoid reactions during desensitization:

Anaphylactoid reactions during membrane exposure:

Hypotension and Related Effects:

Syncope has been reported in 0.8 percent of patients receiving lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide. In patients with hypertension receiving lisinopril alone, the incidence of syncope was 0.1 percent. The overall incidence of syncope may be reduced by proper titration of the individual components. (See and )

In patients with severe congestive heart failure, with or without associated renal insufficiency, excessive hypotension has been observed and may be associated with oliguria and/or progressive azotemia, and rarely with acute renal failure and/or death. Because of the potential fall in blood pressure in these patients, therapy should be started under very close medical supervision. Such patients should be followed closely for the first two weeks of treatment and whenever the dose of lisinopril and/or diuretic is increased. Similar considerations apply to patients with ischemic heart or cerebrovascular disease in whom an excessive fall in blood pressure could result in a myocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident.

If hypotension occurs, the patient should be placed in supine position and, if necessary, receive an intravenous infusion of normal saline. A transient hypotensive response is not a contraindication to further doses which usually can be given without difficulty once the blood pressure has increased after volume expansion.

Neutropenia/Agranulocytosis:

Another angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, has been shown to cause agranulocytosis and bone marrow depression, rarely in uncomplicated patients but more frequently in patients with renal impairment, especially if they also have a collagen vascular disease. Available data from clinical trials of lisinopril are insufficient to show that lisinopril does not cause agranulocytosis at similar rates. Marketing experience has revealed rare cases of neutropenia and bone marrow depression in which a causal relationship to lisinopril cannot be excluded. Periodic monitoring white blood cell counts in patients with collagen vascular disease and renal disease should be considered.

Hepatic Failure:

Rarely, ACE inhibitors have been associated with a syndrome that starts with cholestatic jaundice and progresses to fulminant hepatic necrosis, and (sometimes) death. The mechanism of this syndrome is not understood. Patients receiving ACE inhibitors who develop jaundice or marked elevations of hepatic enzymes should discontinue the ACE inhibitor and receive appropriate medical follow-up.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazides should be used with caution in severe renal disease. In patients with renal disease, thiazides may precipitate azotemia. Cumulative effects of the drug may develop in patients with impaired renal function.

Thiazides should be used with caution in patients with impaired hepatic function or progressive liver disease, since minor alterations of fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma.

Sensitivity reactions may occur in patients with or without a history of allergy or bronchial asthma.

The possibility of exacerbation or activation of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported.

Lithium generally should not be given with thiazides (see and ).

Pregnancy

Lisinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide

Teratogenicity studies were conducted in mice and rats with up to 90 mg/kg/day of lisinopril in combination with 10 mg/kg/day of hydrochlorothiazide. This dose of lisinopril is 5 times (in mice) and 10 times (in rats) the maximum recommended human daily dose (MRHDD) when compared on a body surface area basis (mg/m); the dose of hydrochlorothiazide is 0.9 times (in mice) and 1.8 times (in rats) the MRHDD. Maternal or fetotoxic effects were not seen in mice with the combination. In rats decreased maternal weight gain and decreased fetal weight occurred down to 3/10 mg/kg/day (the lowest dose tested). Associated with the decreased fetal weight was a delay in fetal ossification. The decreased fetal weight and delay in fetal ossification were not seen in saline-supplemented animals given 90/10 mg/kg/day.

When used in pregnancy during the second and third trimesters, ACE inhibitors can cause injury and even death to the developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide should be discontinued as soon as possible. (See below.)

Lisinopril

Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality:

The use of ACE inhibitors during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy has been associated with fetal and neonatal injury, including hypotension, neonatal skull hypoplasia, anuria, reversible or irreversible renal failure, and death. Oligohydramnios has also been reported, presumably resulting from decreased fetal renal function; oligohydramnios in this setting has been associated with fetal limb contractures, craniofacial deformation, and hypoplastic lung development. Prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, and patent ductus arteriosus have also been reported, although it is not clear whether these occurrences were due to the ACE-inhibitor exposure.

These adverse effects do not appear to have resulted from intrauterine ACE-inhibitor exposure that has been limited to the first trimester. Mothers whose embryos and fetuses are exposed to ACE inhibitors only during the first trimester should be so informed. Nonetheless, when patients become pregnant; physicians should make every effort to discontinue the use of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide as soon as possible.

Rarely (probably less often than once in every thousand pregnancies), no alternative to ACE inhibitors will be found. In these rare cases, the mothers should be apprised of the potential hazards to their fetuses, and serial ultrasound examinations should be performed to assess the intraamniotic environment.

If oligohydramnios is observed, lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide should be discontinued unless it is considered lifesaving for the mother. Contraction stress testing (CST), a non-stress test (NST), or biophysical profiling (BPP) may be appropriate, depending upon the week of pregnancy. Patients and physicians should be aware, however, that oligohydramnios may not appear until after the fetus has sustained irreversible injury.

Infants with histories of exposure to ACE inhibitors should be closely observed for hypotension, oliguria, and hyperkalemia. If oliguria occurs, attention should be directed toward support of blood pressure and renal perfusion. Exchange transfusion or dialysis may be required as means of reversing hypotension and/or substituting for disordered renal function. Lisinopril, which crosses the placenta, has been removed from neonatal circulation by peritoneal dialysis with some clinical benefit, and theoretically may be removed by exchange transfusion, although there is no experience with the latter procedure.

No teratogenic effects of lisinopril were seen in studies of pregnant mice, rats, and rabbits. On a body surface area basis, the doses used were up 55 times, 33 times, and 0.15 times, respectively, the MRHDD.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Studies in which hydrochlorothiazide was orally administered to pregnant mice and rats during their respective periods of major organogenesis at doses up to 3000 and 1000 mg/kg/day, respectively, provided no evidence of harm to the fetus. These doses are more than 150 times the MRHDD on a body surface area basis. Thiazides cross the placental barrier and appear in cord blood. There is a risk of fetal or neonatal jaundice, thrombocytopenia and possibly other adverse reactions that have occurred in adults.


What are the precautions of Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

General

Lisinopril

Aortic Stenosis/Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

Impaired Renal Function:

In hypertensive patients with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis, increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine may occur. Experience with another angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor suggests that these increases are usually reversible upon discontinuation of lisinopril and/or diuretic therapy. In such patients renal function should be monitored during the first few weeks of therapy.

Some hypertensive patients with no apparent pre-existing renal vascular disease have developed increases in blood urea and serum creatinine, usually minor and transient, especially when lisinopril has been given concomitantly with a diuretic. This is more likely to occur in patients with pre-existing renal impairment. Dosage reduction of lisinopril and/or discontinuation of the diuretic may be required.

Evaluation of the hypertensive patient should always include assessment of renal function. (See .)

Hyperkalemia:

Cough:

Surgery/Anesthesia:

Hydrochlorothiazide

Periodic determination of serum electrolytes to detect possible electrolyte imbalance should be performed at appropriate intervals.

All patients receiving thiazide therapy should be observed for clinical signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance: namely, hyponatremia, hypochloremic alkalosis, and hypokalemia. Serum and urine electrolyte determinations are particularly important when the patient is vomiting excessively or receiving parenteral fluids. Warning signs or symptoms of fluid and electrolyte imbalance, irrespective of cause, include dryness of mouth, thirst, weakness, lethargy, drowsiness, restlessness, confusion, seizures, muscle pains or cramps, muscular fatigue, hypotension, oliguria, tachycardia, and gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea and vomiting.

Hypokalemia may develop, especially with brisk dieresis, when severe cirrhosis is present, or after prolonged therapy.

Interference with adequate oral electrolyte intake will also contribute to hypokalemia. Hypokalemia may cause cardiac arrhythmia and may also sensitize or exaggerate the response of the heart to the toxic effects of digitalis (e.g., increased ventricular irritability). Because lisinopril reduces the production of aldosterone, concomitant therapy with lisinopril attenuates the diuretic-induced potassium loss (see ).

Although any chloride deficit is generally mild and usually does not require specific treatment, except under extraordinary circumstances (as in liver disease or renal disease), chloride replacement may be required in the treatment of metabolic alkalosis.

Dilutional hyponatremia may occur in edematous patients in hot weather; appropriate therapy is water restriction, rather than administration of salt except in rare instances when the hyponatremia is life-threatening. In actual salt depletion, appropriate replacement is the therapy of choice.

Hyperuricemia may occur or frank gout may be precipitated in certain patients receiving thiazide therapy.

In diabetic patients dosage adjustments of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents may be required. Hyperglycemia may occur with thiazide diuretics. Thus latent diabetes mellitus may become manifest during thiazide therapy.

The antihypertensive effects of the drug may be enhanced in the postsympathectomy patients. If progressive renal impairment becomes evident consider withholding or discontinuing diuretic therapy.

Thiazides have been shown to increase the urinary excretion of magnesium; this may result in hypomagnesemia.

Thiazides may decrease urinary calcium excretion. Thiazides may cause intermittent and slight elevation of serum calcium in the absence of known disorders of calcium metabolism. Marked hypercalcemia may be evidence of hidden hyperparathyroidism.

Thiazides should be discontinued before carrying out tests for parathyroid function.

Increases in cholesterol and triglyceride levels maybe associated with thiazide diuretic therapy.

Information for Patients

Angioedema:

Symptomatic Hypotension:

All patients should be cautioned that excessive perspiration and dehydration may lead to an excessive fall in blood pressure because of reduction in fluid volume. Other causes of volume depletion such as vomiting or diarrhea may also lead to a fall in blood pressure; patients should be advised to consult with their physician.

Hyperkalemia:

Neutropenia:

Pregnancy:

NOTE: As with many other drugs, certain advice to patients being treated with lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is warranted. This information is intended to aid in the safe and effective use of this medication. It is not a disclosure of all possible adverse or intended effects.

Drug Interactions

Lisinopril

Hypotension- Patients on Diuretic Therapy:

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents:

Reports suggest that NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of ACE inhibitors, including lisinopril. The interaction should be given consideration in patients taking NSAIDs concomitantly with ACE-inhibitors.

Other Agents:

Agents Increasing Serum Potassium:

Lithium:

Gold:

Hydrochlorothiazide

When administered concurrently the following drugs may interact with thiazide diuretics.

Alcohol, barbiturates, or narcotics

Antidiabetic drugs

Other antihypertensive drugs

Cholestyramine and colestipol resins

Corticosteroids, ACTH

Pressor amines (e.g., norepinephrine)

Skeletal muscle relaxants, nondepolarizing (e.g., tubocurarine)

Lithium

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Lisinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide

Lisinopril in combination with hydrochlorothiazide was not mutagenic in a microbial mutagen test using (Ames test) or Escherichia coli with or without metabolic activation or in a forward mutation assay using Chinese hamster lung cells. Lisinopril-hydrochlorothiazide did not produce DNA single strand breaks in an alkaline elution rat hepatocyte assay. In addition, it did not produce increases in chromosomal aberrations in an in vitro test in Chinese hamster ovary cells or in an i study in mouse bone marrow.

Lisinopril

There was no evidence of a tumorigenic effect when lisinopril was administered orally for 105 weeks to male and female rats at doses up to 90 mg/kg/day or for 92 weeks to male and female mice at doses up to 135 mg/kg/day. These doses are 10 times and 7 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human daily dose (MRHDD) when compared on a body surface area basis.

Lisinopril was not mutagenic in the Ames microbial mutagen test with or without metabolic activation. It was also negative in a forward mutation assay using Chinese hamster lung cells. Lisinopril did not produce single strand DNA breaks in an alkaline elution rat hepatocyte assay. In addition, lisinopril did not produce increases in chromosomal aberrations in an test in Chinese hamster ovary cells or in an study in mouse bone marrow.

There were no adverse effects on reproductive performance in male and female rats treated with up to 300 mg/kg/day of lisinopril (33 times the MRHDD when compared on a body surface area basis).

Hydrochlorothiazide

Two-year feeding studies in mice and rats conducted under the auspices of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) uncovered no evidence of a carcinogenic potential of hydrochlorothiazide in female mice at doses of up to approximately 600 mg/kg/day (53 times the MRHDD when compared on a body surface area basis) or in male and female rats at doses of up to approximately 100 mg/kg/day (18 times the MRHDD when compared on a body surface area basis). The NTP, however, found equivocal evidence for hepatocarcinogenicity in male mice.

Hydrochlorothiazide was not genotoxic in the Ames mutagenicity assay of strains TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535, TA 1537, and TA 1538 and in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) test for chromosomal aberrations, in assays using mouse germinal cell chromosomes, Chinese hamster bone marrow chromosomes, and the sex-linked recessive lethal trait gene. Positive test results were obtained only in the CHO Sister Chromatid Exchange (clastogenicity) in the Mouse Lymphoma Cell (mutagenicity) assays, using concentrations of hydrochlorothiazide from 43 to 300 μg/mL, and in the non-disjunction assay at an unspecified concentration.

Hydrochlorothiazide had no adverse effects on the fertility of mice and rats of either sex in studies wherein these species were exposed, via their diet, to doses of up to 100 and 4 mg/kg, respectively, prior to conception and throughout gestation. In mice and rats these doses are 9 times and 0.7 times, respectively, the MRHDD when compared on a body surface area basis.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Categories C

and D

Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether lisinopril is secreted in human milk. However, milk of lactating rats contains radioactivity following administration of C lisinopril. In another study, lisinopril was present in rat milk at levels similar to plasma levels in the dams. Thiazides do appear in human milk. Because of the potential for serious reactions in nursing infants from ACE inhibitors and hydrochlorothiazide, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide did not include significant numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. In a multiple dose pharmacokinetic study in elderly versus young hypertensive patients using the lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide combination, area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) increased approximately 120% for lisinopril and approximately 80% for hydrochlorothiazide in older patients.

This drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection. Evaluation of the hypertensive patient should always include assessment of renal function. (See .)


What are the side effects of Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide has been evaluated for safety in 930 patients, including 100 patients treated for 50 weeks or more.

In clinical trials with lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide no adverse experiences peculiar to this combination drug have been observed. Adverse experiences that have occurred have been limited to those that have been previously reported with lisinopril or hydrochlorothiazide.

The most frequent clinical adverse experiences in controlled trials (including open label extensions) with any combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide were: dizziness (7.5 percent), headache (5.2 percent), cough (3.9 percent), fatigue (3.7 percent) and orthostatic effects (3.2 percent), all of which were more common than in placebo-treated patients.

Generally, adverse experiences were mild and transient in nature; but see regarding angioedema and excessive hypotension or syncope. Discontinuation of therapy due to adverse effects was required in 4.4 percent of patients, principally because of dizziness, cough, fatigue and muscle cramps.

Adverse experiences occurring in greater than one percent of patients treated with lisinopril plus hydrochlorothiazide in controlled clinical trials are shown below.

Clinical adverse experiences occurring in 0.3 to 1.0 percent of patients in controlled trials included: Chest pain, abdominal pain, syncope, chest discomfort, fever, trauma, virus infection. Palpitation, orthostatic hypotension. Gastrointestinal cramps, dry mouth, constipation, heartburn. Back pain, shoulder pain, knee pain, back strain, myalgia, foot pain. Decreased libido, vertigo, depression, somnolence. Common cold, nasal congestion, influenza, bronchitis, pharyngeal pain, dyspnea, pulmonary congestion, chronic sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, pharyngeal discomfort. Flushing, pruritus, skin inflammation; diaphoresis. Blurred vision, tinnitus, otalgia. Urinary tract infection.

Percent of Patients in Controlled Studies Linopril-Hydrochlorothiazide
(n=930)Placebo
Incidence(n=207)
(discontinuation)Incidence
Dizziness7.5 (0.8)1.9
Headache5.2 (0.3)1.9
Cough3.9 (0.6)1.0
Fatigue3.7 (0.4)1.0
Orthostatic Effects3.2 (0.1)1.0
Diarrhea2.5 (0.2)2.4
Nausea2.2 (0.1)2.4
Upper Respiratory Infection2.2 (0.0)0.0
Muscle Cramps2.0 (0.4)05
Asthenia1.8 (0.2)1.0
Paresthesia1.5 (0.1)0.0
Hypotension1.4 (0.3)0.5
Vomiting1.4 (01)0.5
Dyspepsia1.3 (0.0)0.0
Rash1.2 (0.1)0.5
Impotence1.2 (0.3)0.0


Angioedema:

Hypotension:

Cough:

Clinical Laboratory Test Findings

Serum Electrolytes:

Creatinine, Blood Urea Nitrogen:

Serum Uric Acid, Glucose, Magnesium, Cholesterol, Triglycerides and Calcium:

Hemoglobin and Hematocrit:

Liver Function Tests:

Other adverse reactions that have been reported with the individual components are listed below:

Lisinopril

Body as a Whole:

Cardiovascular:

Digestive:

Endocrine:

Hematologic:

Metabolic:

Musculoskeletal:

Nervous System/Psychiatric:

Respiratory:

Skin:

Special Senses:

Urogenital:

Miscellaneous:

Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality:

Hydrochlorothiazide

Body as a Whole:

Digestive:

Hematologic:

Musculoskeletal:

Nervous System/Psychiatric:

Renal:

Skin:

Special Senses:

Hypersensitivity:


What should I look out for while using Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to any component of this product and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and in patients with hereditary or idiopathic angioedema. Because of the hydrochlorothiazide component, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.


What might happen if I take too much Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

No specific information is available on the treatment of overdosage with lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Therapy with lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide should be discontinued and the patient observed closely. Suggested measures include induction of emesis and/or gastric lavage, and correction of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and hypotension by established procedures.


How should I store and handle Lisinopril with Hydrochlorothiazide?

Store at 20°-25°C (68°-77°F) (see USP Controlled Room Temperature). PROTECT FROM LIGHT. KEEP TIGHTLY CLOSED. Sarafem is a registered trademark of Eli Lilly and Company. Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 10/12.5 mg are Blue with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 62".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/12.5 mg are Yellow with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 63".Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 20/25 mg are Peach-Red with White Mottling, Round, Unscored Tablet; Embossed "WW 64". They are supplied by as follows:Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from excessive light and humidity.Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.Manufactured By: Eatontown, NJ 07724This Product was Repackaged By:H.J. Harkins Company, Inc.


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

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Clinical Pharmacology

As a result of its diuretic effects, hydrochlorothiazide increases plasma renin activity, increases aldosterone secretion, and decreases serum potassium. Administration of lisinopril blocks the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and tends to reverse the potassium lose associated with the diuretic.

In clinical studies, the extent of blood pressure reduction seen with the combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide was approximately additive. The lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide 10-12.5 mg combination worked equally well in black and white patients. The lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide 20-12.5 mg and lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide combinations appeared somewhat less effective in black patients, but relatively few black patients were studies. In most patients, the antihypertensive effect of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide was sustained for at least 24 hours.

In a randomized, controlled comparison, the mean antihypertensive effects of Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide 20-12.5 mg and Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide 20-25 mg were similar, suggesting that many patients who respond adequately to the latter combination may be controlled with Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide 20-12.5 mg. (See )

Concomitant administration of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide has little or no effect on the bioavailability of either drug. The combination tablet is bioequivalent to concomitant administration of the separate entities.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to any component of this product and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and in patients with hereditary or idiopathic angioedema. Because of the hydrochlorothiazide component, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.

Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide has been evaluated for safety in 930 patients, including 100 patients treated for 50 weeks or more.

In clinical trials with lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide no adverse experiences peculiar to this combination drug have been observed. Adverse experiences that have occurred have been limited to those that have been previously reported with lisinopril or hydrochlorothiazide.

The most frequent clinical adverse experiences in controlled trials (including open label extensions) with any combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide were: dizziness (7.5 percent), headache (5.2 percent), cough (3.9 percent), fatigue (3.7 percent) and orthostatic effects (3.2 percent), all of which were more common than in placebo-treated patients.

Generally, adverse experiences were mild and transient in nature; but see regarding angioedema and excessive hypotension or syncope. Discontinuation of therapy due to adverse effects was required in 4.4 percent of patients, principally because of dizziness, cough, fatigue and muscle cramps.

Adverse experiences occurring in greater than one percent of patients treated with lisinopril plus hydrochlorothiazide in controlled clinical trials are shown below.

Clinical adverse experiences occurring in 0.3 to 1.0 percent of patients in controlled trials included: Chest pain, abdominal pain, syncope, chest discomfort, fever, trauma, virus infection. Palpitation, orthostatic hypotension. Gastrointestinal cramps, dry mouth, constipation, heartburn. Back pain, shoulder pain, knee pain, back strain, myalgia, foot pain. Decreased libido, vertigo, depression, somnolence. Common cold, nasal congestion, influenza, bronchitis, pharyngeal pain, dyspnea, pulmonary congestion, chronic sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, pharyngeal discomfort. Flushing, pruritus, skin inflammation; diaphoresis. Blurred vision, tinnitus, otalgia. Urinary tract infection.

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).