Disclaimer:

Medidex is not a provider of medical services and all information is provided for the convenience of the user. No medical decisions should be made based on the information provided on this website without first consulting a licensed healthcare provider.This website is intended for persons 18 years or older. No person under 18 should consult this website without the permission of a parent or guardian.

Marlido Kit

&times

Overview

What is Marlido Kit?

Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injections are sterile, nonpyrogenic, aqueous, isotonic solutions that contain a local anesthetic agent and are administered parenterally by injection. See    for specific uses.

Each mL of the 1% solution contains lidocaine hydrochloride 10 mg and sodium chloride 7 mg. Each mL of the 2% solution contains lidocaine hydrochloride 20 mg and sodium chloride 6 mg. The pH of these solutions is adjusted to approximately 5.0 to 7.0 with sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid.

Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection solutions contain lidocaine hydrochloride which is chemically designated as acetamide, 2-(diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-, monohydrochloride and has the molecular wt. 270.8. Lidocaine HCl (CHNO • HCl) has the following structural formula:



What does Marlido Kit look like?



What are the available doses of Marlido Kit?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Marlido Kit?

Sorry No records found

How should I use Marlido Kit?

For use as an

Tear at notch, remove applicator, use only once.

As a first aid antiseptic


What interacts with Marlido Kit?

Lidocaine HCl is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.



What are the warnings of Marlido Kit?

The practice of injecting varicosities of the leg with ETHAMOLlN Injection is not supported by adequately-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, such use is not recommended.

LIDOCAINE HCl INJECTIONS FOR INFILTRATION AND NERVE BLOCK SHOULD BE EMPLOYED ONLY BY CLINICIANS WHO ARE WELL VERSED IN DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF DOSE-RELATED TOXICITY AND OTHER ACUTE EMERGENCIES THAT MIGHT ARISE FROM THE BLOCK TO BE EMPLOYED AND THEN ONLY AFTER ENSURING THE AVAILABILITY OF OXYGEN, OTHER RESUSCITATIVE DRUGS, CARDIOPULMONARY EQUIPMENT AND THE PERSONNEL NEEDED FOR PROPER MANAGEMENT OF TOXIC REACTIONS AND RELATED EMERGENCIES (see also and ).  DELAY IN PROPER MANAGEMENT OF DOSE-RELATED TOXICITY, UNDERVENTILATION FROM ANY CAUSE AND/OR ALTERED SENSITIVITY MAY LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACIDOSIS, CARDIAC ARREST AND, POSSIBLY, DEATH.

Intra-articular infusions of local anesthetics following arthroscopic and other surgical procedures is an unapproved use, and there have been post-marketing reports of chondrolysis in patients receiving such infusions.  The majority of reported cases of chondrolysis have involved the shoulder joint; cases of glenohumeral chondrolysis have been described in pediatric and adult patients following intra-articular infusions of local anesthetics with and without epinephrine for periods of 48 to 72 hours.  There is insufficient information to determine whether shorter infusion periods are not associated with these findings.  The time of onset of symptoms, such as joint pain, stiffness and loss of motion can be variable, but may begin as early as the 2nd month after surgery.  Currently, there is no effective treatment for chondrolysis; patients who experienced chondrolysis have required additional diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and some required arthroplasty or shoulder replacement.

To avoid intravascular injection, aspiration should be performed before the local anesthetic solution is injected.  The needle must be repositioned until no return of blood can be elicited by aspiration.  Note, however, that the absence of blood in the syringe does not guarantee that intravascular injection has been avoided.


What are the precautions of Marlido Kit?

General

The safety and effectiveness of lidocaine HCl depend on proper dosage, correct technique, adequate precautions, and readiness for emergencies.  Standard textbooks should be consulted for specific techniques and precautions for various regional anesthetic procedures.

Resuscitative equipment, oxygen, and other resuscitative drugs should be available for immediate use (see and ).  The lowest dosage that results in effective anesthesia should be used to avoid high plasma levels and serious adverse effects.  Syringe aspirations should also be performed before and during each supplemental injection when using indwelling catheter techniques.  During the administration of epidural anesthesia, it is recommended that a test dose be administered initially and that the patient be monitored for central nervous system toxicity and cardiovascular toxicity, as well as for signs of unintended intrathecal administration, before proceeding.  When clinical conditions permit, consideration should be given to employing local anesthetic solutions that contain epinephrine for the test dose because circulatory changes compatible with epinephrine may also serve as a warning sign of unintended intravascular injection.  An intravascular injection is still possible even if aspirations for blood are negative.  Repeated doses of lidocaine HCl may cause significant increases in blood levels with each repeated dose because of slow accumulation of the drug or its metabolites.  Tolerance to elevated blood levels varies with the status of the patient.  Debilitated, elderly patients, acutely ill patients, and children should be given reduced doses commensurate with their age and physical condition.  Lidocaine HCl should also be used with caution in patients with severe shock or heart block.

Lumbar and caudal epidural anesthesia should be used with extreme caution in persons with the following conditions: existing neurological disease, spinal deformities, septicemia, and severe hypertension.

Local anesthetic solutions containing a vasoconstrictor should be used cautiously and in carefully circumscribed quantities in areas of the body supplied by end arteries or having otherwise compromised blood supply.  Patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with hypertensive vascular disease may exhibit exaggerated vasoconstrictor response.  Ischemic injury or necrosis may result.  Preparations containing a vasoconstrictor should be used with caution in patients during or following the administration of potent general anesthetic agents, since cardiac arrhythmias may occur under such conditions.

Careful and constant monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory (adequacy of ventilation) vital signs and the patient’s state of consciousness should be accomplished after each local anesthetic injection.  It should be kept in mind at such times that restlessness, anxiety, tinnitus, dizziness, blurred vision, tremors, depression or drowsiness may be early warning signs of central nervous system toxicity.  

Since amide-type local anesthetics are metabolized by the liver, Lidocaine HCl Injection should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease.  Patients with severe hepatic disease, because of their inability to metabolize local anesthetics normally, are at greater risk of developing toxic plasma concentrations.  Lidocaine HCl Injection should also be used with caution in patients with impaired cardiovascular function since they may be less able to compensate for functional changes associated with the prolongation of A-V conduction produced by these drugs.    

Many drugs used during the conduct of anesthesia are considered potential triggering agents for familial malignant hyperthermia.  Since it is not known whether amide-type local anesthetics may trigger this reaction and since the need for supplemental general anesthesia cannot be predicted in advance, it is suggested that a standard protocol for the management of malignant hyperthermia should be available.  Early unexplained signs of tachycardia, tachypnea, labile blood pressure and metabolic acidosis may precede temperature elevation.  Successful outcome is dependent on early diagnosis, prompt discontinuance of the suspect triggering agent(s) and institution of treatment, including oxygen therapy, indicated supportive measures and dantrolene (consult dantrolene sodium intravenous package insert before using).

Proper tourniquet technique, as described in publications and standard textbooks, is essential in the performance of intravenous regional anesthesia.  Solutions containing epinephrine or other vasoconstrictors should not be used for this technique.

Lidocaine HCl should be used with caution in persons with known drug sensitivities.  Patients allergic to para-aminobenzoic acid derivatives (procaine, tetracaine, benzocaine, etc.) have not shown cross-sensitivity to lidocaine HCl.

Use in the Head and Neck Area

Small doses of local anesthetics injected into the head and neck area, including retrobulbar, dental and stellate ganglion blocks, may produce adverse reactions similar to systemic toxicity seen with unintentional intravascular injections of larger doses.  Confusion, convulsions, respiratory depression and/or respiratory arrest, and cardiovascular stimulation or depression have been reported.  These reactions may be due to intra-arterial injection of the local anesthetic with retrograde flow to the cerebral circulation.  Patients receiving these blocks should have their circulation and respiration monitored and be constantly observed.  Resuscitative equipment and personnel for treating adverse reactions should be immediately available.  Dosage recommendations should not be exceeded (see ).

Information for Patients

When appropriate, patients should be informed in advance that they may experience temporary loss of sensation and motor activity, usually in the lower half of the body, following proper administration of epidural anesthesia.

Clinically Significant Drug Interactions

The administration of local anesthetic solutions containing epinephrine or norepinephrine to patients receiving monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants may produce severe, prolonged hypertension.

Phenothiazines and butyrophenones may reduce or reverse the pressor effect of epinephrine. Concurrent use of these agents should generally be avoided.  In situations when concurrent therapy is necessary, careful patient monitoring is essential.

Concurrent administration of vasopressor drugs (for the treatment of hypotension related to obstetric blocks) and ergot-type oxytocic drugs may cause severe, persistent hypertension or cerebrovascular accidents.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

The intramuscular injection of lidocaine HCl may result in an increase in creatine phosphokinase levels.  Thus, the use of this enzyme determination, without isoenzyme separation, as a diagnostic test for the presence of acute myocardial infarction may be compromised by the intramuscular injection of lidocaine HCl.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Studies of lidocaine HCl in animals to evaluate the carcinogenic and mutagenic potential or the effect on fertility have not been conducted.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects: Pregnancy Category B. 

Reproduction studies have been performed in rats at doses up to 6.6 times the human dose and have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus caused by lidocaine HCl.  There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.  Animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response.  General consideration should be given to this fact before administering lidocaine HCl to women of childbearing potential, especially during early pregnancy when maximum organogenesis takes place.

Labor and Delivery

Local anesthetics rapidly cross the placenta and when used for epidural, paracervical, pudendal or caudal block anesthesia, can cause varying degrees of maternal, fetal and neonatal toxicity (see ).  The potential for toxicity depends upon the procedure performed, the type and amount of drug used, and the technique of drug administration.  Adverse reactions in the parturient, fetus and neonate involve alterations of the central nervous system, peripheral vascular tone and cardiac function.

Maternal hypotension has resulted from regional anesthesia.  Local anesthetics produce vasodilation by blocking sympathetic nerves.  Elevating the patient’s legs and positioning her on her left side will help prevent decreases in blood pressure.

The fetal heart rate also should be monitored continuously, and electronic fetal monitoring is highly advisable.

Epidural, spinal, paracervical, or pudendal anesthesia may alter the forces of parturition through changes in uterine contractility or maternal expulsive efforts.  In one study, paracervical block anesthesia was associated with a decrease in the mean duration of first stage labor and facilitation of cervical dilation.  However, spinal and epidural anesthesia have also been reported to prolong the second stage of labor by removing the parturient’s reflex urge to bear down or by interfering with motor function.  The use of obstetrical anesthesia may increase the need for forceps assistance.

The use of some local anesthetic drug products during labor and delivery may be followed by diminished muscle strength and tone for the first day or two of life.  The long-term significance of these observations is unknown.  Fetal bradycardia may occur in 20 to 30 percent of patients receiving paracervical nerve block anesthesia with the amide-type local anesthetics and may be associated with fetal acidosis.  Fetal heart rate should always be monitored during paracervical anesthesia.  The physician should weigh the possible advantages against risks when considering a paracervical block in prematurity, toxemia of pregnancy, and fetal distress.  Careful adherence to recommended dosage is of the utmost importance in obstetrical paracervical block.  Failure to achieve adequate analgesia with recommended doses should arouse suspicion of intravascular or fetal intracranial injection.  Cases compatible with unintended fetal intracranial injection of local anesthetic solution have been reported following intended paracervical or pudendal block or both.  Babies so affected present with unexplained neonatal depression at birth, which correlates with high local anesthetic serum levels, and often manifest seizures within six hours.  Prompt use of supportive measures combined with forced urinary excretion of the local anesthetic has been used successfully to manage this complication.

Case reports of maternal convulsions and cardiovascular collapse following use of some local anesthetics for paracervical block in early pregnancy (as anesthesia for elective abortion) suggest that systemic absorption under these circumstances may be rapid.  The recommended maximum dose of each drug should not be exceeded.  Injection should be made slowly and with frequent aspiration.  Allow a 5-minute interval between sides.

Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk.  Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when lidocaine HCl is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Dosages in pediatric patients should be reduced, commensurate with age, body weight and physical condition (see ).


What are the side effects of Marlido Kit?

Systemic

Adverse experiences following the administration of lidocaine HCl are similar in nature to those observed with other amide local anesthetic agents.  These adverse experiences are, in general, dose-related and may result from high plasma levels caused by excessive dosage, rapid absorption or inadvertent intravascular injection, or may result from a hypersensitivity, idiosyncrasy or diminished tolerance on the part of the patient.  Serious adverse experiences are generally systemic in nature.  The following types are those most commonly reported:

Central Nervous System

CNS manifestations are excitatory and/or depressant and may be characterized by lightheadedness, nervousness, apprehension, euphoria, confusion, dizziness, drowsiness, tinnitus, blurred or double vision, vomiting, sensations of heat, cold or numbness, twitching, tremors, convulsions, unconsciousness, respiratory depression and arrest.  The excitatory manifestations may be very brief or may not occur at all, in which case the first manifestation of toxicity may be drowsiness merging into unconsciousness and respiratory arrest.

Drowsiness following the administration of lidocaine HCl is usually an early sign of a high blood level of the drug and may occur as a consequence of rapid absorption.

Cardiovascular System

Cardiovascular manifestations are usually depressant and are characterized by bradycardia, hypotension, and cardiovascular collapse, which may lead to cardiac arrest.

Allergic

Allergic reactions are characterized by cutaneous lesions, urticaria, edema or anaphylactoid reactions.  Allergic reactions may occur as a result of sensitivity to local anesthetic agents.  Allergic reactions as a result of sensitivity to lidocaine HCl are extremely rare and, if they occur, should be managed by conventional means.  The detection of sensitivity by skin testing is of doubtful value.

Neurologic

The incidences of adverse reactions associated with the use of local anesthetics may be related to the total dose of local anesthetic administered and are also dependent upon the particular drug used, the route of administration and the physical status of the patient.  In a prospective review of 10,440 patients who received lidocaine HCl for spinal anesthesia, the incidences of adverse reactions were reported to be about 3 percent each for positional headaches, hypotension and backache; 2 percent for shivering; and less than 1 percent each for peripheral nerve symptoms, nausea, respiratory inadequacy and double vision.  Many of these observations may be related to local anesthetic techniques, with or without a contribution from the local anesthetic.

In the practice of caudal or lumbar epidural block, occasional unintentional penetration of the subarachnoid space by the catheter may occur.  Subsequent adverse effects may depend partially on the amount of drug administered subdurally.  These may include spinal block of varying magnitude (including total spinal block), hypotension secondary to spinal block, loss of bladder and bowel control, and loss of perineal sensation and sexual function.  Persistent motor, sensory and/or autonomic (sphincter control) deficit of some lower spinal segments with slow recovery (several months) or incomplete recovery have been reported in rare instances when caudal or lumbar epidural block has been attempted.  Backache and headache have also been noted following use of these anesthetic procedures.

There have been reported cases of permanent injury to extraocular muscles requiring surgical repair following retrobulbar administration.


What should I look out for while using Marlido Kit?

Lidocaine HCl is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.

Section Text


What might happen if I take too much Marlido Kit?

Acute emergencies from local anesthetics are generally related to high plasma levels encountered during therapeutic use of local anesthetics or to unintended subarachnoid injection of local anesthetic solution (see and ).


How should I store and handle Marlido Kit?

Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.Lidocaine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is available as:Preservative-Free1% (50 mg/5 mL) (10 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9595-25) 2% (100 mg/5 mL) (20 mgmL)    5 mL Single Dose Vials packaged in 25s (0143-9594-25)Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].   To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. at 1-877-845-0689, or the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or .For Product Inquiry call 1-877-845-0689.


&times

Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

Lidocaine HCl stabilizes the neuronal membrane by inhibiting the ionic fluxes required for the initiation and conduction of impulses thereby effecting local anesthetic action.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Lidocaine HCl is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.

Section Text

Neprilysin Inhibitors

Patients taking concomitant neprilysin inhibitors may be at increased risk for angioedema (see WARNINGS).

The safety and effectiveness of lidocaine HCl depend on proper dosage, correct technique, adequate precautions, and readiness for emergencies.  Standard textbooks should be consulted for specific techniques and precautions for various regional anesthetic procedures.

Resuscitative equipment, oxygen, and other resuscitative drugs should be available for immediate use (see and ).  The lowest dosage that results in effective anesthesia should be used to avoid high plasma levels and serious adverse effects.  Syringe aspirations should also be performed before and during each supplemental injection when using indwelling catheter techniques.  During the administration of epidural anesthesia, it is recommended that a test dose be administered initially and that the patient be monitored for central nervous system toxicity and cardiovascular toxicity, as well as for signs of unintended intrathecal administration, before proceeding.  When clinical conditions permit, consideration should be given to employing local anesthetic solutions that contain epinephrine for the test dose because circulatory changes compatible with epinephrine may also serve as a warning sign of unintended intravascular injection.  An intravascular injection is still possible even if aspirations for blood are negative.  Repeated doses of lidocaine HCl may cause significant increases in blood levels with each repeated dose because of slow accumulation of the drug or its metabolites.  Tolerance to elevated blood levels varies with the status of the patient.  Debilitated, elderly patients, acutely ill patients, and children should be given reduced doses commensurate with their age and physical condition.  Lidocaine HCl should also be used with caution in patients with severe shock or heart block.

Lumbar and caudal epidural anesthesia should be used with extreme caution in persons with the following conditions: existing neurological disease, spinal deformities, septicemia, and severe hypertension.

Local anesthetic solutions containing a vasoconstrictor should be used cautiously and in carefully circumscribed quantities in areas of the body supplied by end arteries or having otherwise compromised blood supply.  Patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with hypertensive vascular disease may exhibit exaggerated vasoconstrictor response.  Ischemic injury or necrosis may result.  Preparations containing a vasoconstrictor should be used with caution in patients during or following the administration of potent general anesthetic agents, since cardiac arrhythmias may occur under such conditions.

Careful and constant monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory (adequacy of ventilation) vital signs and the patient’s state of consciousness should be accomplished after each local anesthetic injection.  It should be kept in mind at such times that restlessness, anxiety, tinnitus, dizziness, blurred vision, tremors, depression or drowsiness may be early warning signs of central nervous system toxicity.  

Since amide-type local anesthetics are metabolized by the liver, Lidocaine HCl Injection should be used with caution in patients with hepatic disease.  Patients with severe hepatic disease, because of their inability to metabolize local anesthetics normally, are at greater risk of developing toxic plasma concentrations.  Lidocaine HCl Injection should also be used with caution in patients with impaired cardiovascular function since they may be less able to compensate for functional changes associated with the prolongation of A-V conduction produced by these drugs.    

Many drugs used during the conduct of anesthesia are considered potential triggering agents for familial malignant hyperthermia.  Since it is not known whether amide-type local anesthetics may trigger this reaction and since the need for supplemental general anesthesia cannot be predicted in advance, it is suggested that a standard protocol for the management of malignant hyperthermia should be available.  Early unexplained signs of tachycardia, tachypnea, labile blood pressure and metabolic acidosis may precede temperature elevation.  Successful outcome is dependent on early diagnosis, prompt discontinuance of the suspect triggering agent(s) and institution of treatment, including oxygen therapy, indicated supportive measures and dantrolene (consult dantrolene sodium intravenous package insert before using).

Proper tourniquet technique, as described in publications and standard textbooks, is essential in the performance of intravenous regional anesthesia.  Solutions containing epinephrine or other vasoconstrictors should not be used for this technique.

Lidocaine HCl should be used with caution in persons with known drug sensitivities.  Patients allergic to para-aminobenzoic acid derivatives (procaine, tetracaine, benzocaine, etc.) have not shown cross-sensitivity to lidocaine HCl.

&times

Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

&times

Review

Rate this treatment and share your opinion


Helpful tips to write a good review:

  1. Only share your first hand experience as a consumer or a care giver.
  2. Describe your experience in the Comments area including the benefits, side effects and how it has worked for you. Do not provide personal information like email addresses or telephone numbers.
  3. Fill in the optional information to help other users benefit from your review.

Reason for Taking This Treatment

(required)

Click the stars to rate this treatment

This medication has worked for me.




This medication has been easy for me to use.




Overall, I have been satisfied with my experience.




Write a brief description of your experience with this treatment:

2000 characters remaining

Optional Information

Help others benefit from your review by filling in the information below.
I am a:
Gender:
&times

Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
&times

Tips

Tips

&times

Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).