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Lidocaine Hydrochloride

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Overview

What is PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Contains lidocaine HCl 4.12% in a mild acidic vehicle. Lidocaine is chemically designated as acetamide, 2-(diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl), and has the following structure:

Ingredients:

PharmaPureRx Lidocaine 4.12% Cream



What does PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12% look like?



What are the available doses of PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Sorry No records found.

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Sorry No records found

How should I use PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

For the temporary relief of pain and itching associated with minor burns, sunburn, minor cuts, scrapes, insect bites, and minor skin irritation.

Apply a thin film to the affected area two or three times daily or as directed by a physician.


What interacts with PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Tuberculous or fungal lesions of skin vaccinia, varicella and acute herpes simplex and in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of its components. Lidocaine is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.



What are the warnings of PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

The occurrence of hypersensitivity reactions to allopurinol may be increased in patients with decreased renal function receiving thiazides and allopurinol concurrently. For these reasons, in this clinical setting, such combinations should be administered with caution and patients should be observed closely.


What are the precautions of PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

If irritation or sensitivity occurs or infection appears, discontinue use and institute appropriate therapy. should be used with caution in ill, elderly, debilitated patients and children who may be more sensitive to the systemic effects of lidocaine.

CARCINOGENESIS, MUTAGENESIS AND IMPAIRMENT OF FERTILITY:

USE IN PREGNANCY:

NURSINIG MOTHERS:

PEDIATRIC USE:


What are the side effects of PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

During or immediately after treatment, the skin at the site of treatment may develop erythema or edema or may be the locus of abnormal sensation.


What should I look out for while using PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Tuberculous or fungal lesions of skin vaccinia, varicella and acute herpes simplex and in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of its components. Lidocaine is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.

For external use only. Not for ophthalmic use.


What might happen if I take too much PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Sorry No Records found


How should I store and handle PharmapureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12%?

Procedures for proper handling and disposal of anticancer drugs should be considered. Several guidelines on this subject have been published []. PharmaPureRx Lidocaine HCl 4.12% Cream


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

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Clinical Pharmacology

Mechanism of Action: PharmaPureRx Lidocaine 4.12% Cream

Pharmacokinetics:

Lidocaine is metabolized rapidly by the liver, and metabolites and unchanged drug are excreted by the kidneys. Biotransformation includes oxidative N-dealkylation, ring hydroxylation, cleavage of the amide linkage, and conjungation. N-dealkylation, a major pathway of biotransformation, yields the metabolites monoethylglycinexylidide and glycinexlidide. The pharmacological/toxicological actions of these metabolites are similar to, but less potent than, those of lidocaine. Approximately 90% of lidocaine administered is excreted in the form of various metabolites and less than 10% is excreted unchanged. The primary metabolite in urine is a conjugate of 4-hydroxy-2, 6-dimethylaniline. The plasma binding of lidocaine is dependent on drug concentration and the fraction bound decreases with increasing concentration. At concentration of 1 to 4 g of free base per mL, 60 to 80 percent of lidocaine is protein bound. Binding is also dependent on the plasma concentration of the alpha-1-acid-glycoprotein. Lidocaine crosses the blood-brain and placental barriers, presumably by passive diffusion. Studies of lidocaine metabolism following intravenous bolus injections have shown that the elimination half-life of this agent is typically 1.5 to 2 hours. Because of the rapid rate at which lidocaine is metabolized, any condition that affects liver function may alter lidocaine kinetics. The half-life may be prolonged two-fold or more in patients with liver dysfunction. Renal dysfunction does not affect lidocaine kinetics but may increase the accumulation of metabolites. Factors such as acidosis and the use of CNS stimulants and depressants affect the CNS levels of lidocaine required to produce overt systemic effects. Objective adverse manifestations become increasingly apparent with increasing venous plasma levels above 6 g free base per mL. In the rhesus monkey, arterial blood levels of 18-21 g/mL have been shown to be threshold for convulsive activity.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
Tuberculous or fungal lesions of skin vaccinia, varicella and acute herpes simplex and in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of its components. Lidocaine is contraindicated in patients with a known history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide type.

For external use only. Not for ophthalmic use.

In patients receiving mercaptopurine or azathioprine, the concomitant administration of 300 to 600 mg of allopurinol per day will require a reduction in dose to approximately one-third to one-fourth of the usual dose of mercaptopurine or azathioprine. Subsequent adjustment of doses of mercaptopurine or azathioprine should be made on the basis of therapeutic response and the appearance of toxic effects (see ).

It has been reported that allopurinol prolongs the half-life of the anticoagulant, dicumarol. The clinical basis of this drug interaction has not been established but should be noted when allopurinol is given to patients already on dicumarol therapy.

Since the excretion of oxipurinol is similar to that of urate, uricosuric agents, which increase the excretion of urate, are also likely to increase the excretion of oxipurinol and thus lower the degree of inhibition of xanthine oxidase. The concomitant administration of uricosuric agents and allopurinol has been associated with a decrease in the excretion of oxypurines (hypoxanthine and xanthine) and an increase in urinary uric acid excretion compared with that observed with allopurinol alone. Although clinical evidence to date has not demonstrated renal precipitation of oxypurines in patients either on allopurinol alone or in combination with uricosuric agents, the possibility should be kept in mind.

The reports that the concomitant use of allopurinol and thiazide diuretics may contribute to the enhancement of allopurinol toxicity in some patients have been reviewed in an attempt to establish a cause-and-effect relationship and a mechanism of causation. Review of these case reports indicates that the patients were mainly receiving thiazide diuretics for hypertension and that tests to rule out decreased renal function secondary to hypertensive nephropathy were not often performed. In those patients in whom renal insufficiency was documented, however, the recommendation to lower the dose of allopurinol was not followed. Although a causal mechanism and a cause-and-effect relationship have not been established, current evidence suggests that renal function should be monitored in patients on thiazide diuretics and allopurinol even in the absence of renal failure, and dosage levels should be even more conservatively adjusted in those patients on such combined therapy if diminished renal function is detected.

An increase in the frequency of skin rash has been reported among patients receiving ampicillin or amoxicillin concurrently with allopurinol compared to patients who are not receiving both drugs. The cause of the reported association has not been established.

Enhanced bone marrow suppression by cyclophosphamide and other cytotoxic agents has been reported among patients with neoplastic disease, except leukemia, in the presence of allopurinol. However, in a well-controlled study of patients with lymphoma on combination therapy, allopurinol did not increase the marrow toxicity of patients treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, bleomycin, procarbazine, and/or mechlorethamine.

Tolbutamide's conversion to inactive metabolites has been shown to be catalyzed by xanthine oxidase from rat liver. The clinical significance, if any, of these observations is unknown.

Chlorpropamide's plasma half-life may be prolonged by allopurinol, since allopurinol and chlorpropamide may compete for excretion in the renal tubule. The risk of hypoglycemia secondary to this mechanism may be increased if allopurinol and chlorpropamide are given concomitantly in the presence of renal insufficiency.

Rare reports indicate that cyclosporine levels may be increased during concomitant treatment with allopurinol. Monitoring of cyclosporine levels and possible adjustment of cyclosporine dosage should be considered when these drugs are co-administered.

If irritation or sensitivity occurs or infection appears, discontinue use and institute appropriate therapy. should be used with caution in ill, elderly, debilitated patients and children who may be more sensitive to the systemic effects of lidocaine.

CARCINOGENESIS, MUTAGENESIS AND IMPAIRMENT OF FERTILITY:

USE IN PREGNANCY:

NURSINIG MOTHERS:

PEDIATRIC USE:

During or immediately after treatment, the skin at the site of treatment may develop erythema or edema or may be the locus of abnormal sensation.

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Professional

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Tips

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Interactions

Interactions

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