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PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN

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Overview

What is PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets USP contain propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen.

Propoxyphene napsylate is an odorless, white crystalline powder with a bitter taste. It is very slightly soluble in water, soluble in methanol, in ethanol, in chloroform, and in acetone. Chemically it is (α,1)-α-[2-(dimethylamino)-1-methylethyl]-α-phenylphenethyl propionate compound with 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (1:1) monohydrate and can be represented by the following structural formula:

CHNO•CHOS•HO          M.W. 565.74

Propoxyphene napsylate differs from propoxyphene hydrochloride in that it allows more stable liquid dosage forms and tablet formulations. Because of differences in molecular weight, a dose of 100 mg (176.8 μmol) of propoxyphene napsylate is required to supply an amount of propoxyphene equivalent to that present in 65 mg (172.9 μmol) of propoxyphene hydrochloride.

Acetaminophen, 4'-hydroxyacetanilide, is a non-opiate, non-salicylate analgesic and antipyretic which occurs as a white, odorless, crystalline powder, possessing a slightly bitter taste. Chemically, it is acetamide, -(4-hydroxyphenyl)- and can structurally be represented by the following:

CHNO          M.W. 151.16

Each pink tablet of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets contains 100 mg propoxyphene napsylate and 650 mg acetaminophen.

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets, USP 100 mg/650 mg (PINK) contain the following inactive ingredients:

colloidal silicon dioxide,D and C red No 27 aluminum lake, D and C yellow No 10 aluminum lake, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hypromellose, magnesium stearate,microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, povidone, pregelatinized starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, and crospovidone.



What does PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN look like?



What are the available doses of PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

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What should I talk to my health care provider before I take PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

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How should I use PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

Proproxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets USP are intended for the management of mild to moderate pain. The dose should be individually adjusted according to severity of pain, patient response and patient size.

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets USP (100 mg propoxyphene napsylate and 650 mg acetaminophen)

The usual dosage is one tablet every 4 hours orally as needed for pain. The maximum dose of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets USP is 6 tablets per day.

Patients receiving propoxyphene and any CYP3A4 inhibitor should be carefully monitored for an extended period of time and dosage adjustments should be made if warranted.

Consideration should be given to a reduced total daily dosage in elderly patients and in patients with hepatic or renal impairment.


What interacts with PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to propoxyphene or acetaminophen.


Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with significant respiratory depression (in unmonitored settings or the absence of resuscitative equipment) and patients with acute or severe asthma or hypercarbia.


Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in any patient who has or is suspected of having paralytic ileus.



What are the warnings of PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

Array

Respiratory Depression

Hypotensive Effect

Head Injury and Increased Intracranial Pressure

Drug Interactions

Usage in Ambulatory Patients

Use With Other Acetaminophen-Containing Agents

Use With Alcohol


What are the precautions of PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

Tolerance is the need for increasing doses of opioids to maintain a defined effect such as analgesia (in the absence of disease progression or other external factors). Physical dependence is manifested by withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation of a drug or upon administration of an antagonist. Physical dependence and tolerance are not unusual during chronic opioid therapy.

The opioid abstinence or withdrawal syndrome is characterized by some or all of the following: restlessness, lacrimation, rhinorrhea, yawning, perspiration, chills, myalgia, and mydriasis. Other symptoms also may develop, including: irritability, anxiety, backache, joint pain, weakness, abdominal cramps, insomnia, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, or increased blood pressure, respiratory rate, or heart rate. In general, opioids should not be abruptly discontinued

If propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient, an abstinence syndrome may occur . If signs and symptoms of withdrawal occur, patients should be treated by reinstitution of opioid therapy followed by gradual tapered dose reduction of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets combined with symptomatic support

Use in Pancreatic/Biliary Tract Disease

Hepatic or Renal Impairment

Information for Patients/Caregivers



















                    Drug Interactions With Propoxyphene

                    Propoxyphene is metabolized mainly via the human cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme system (CYP3A4), therefore potential interactions may occur when propoxyphene is administered concurrently with agents that affect CYP3A4 activity.

                    The metabolism of propoxyphene may be altered by strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (such as ritonavir, ketoconazole, itraconazole, troleandomycin, clarithromycin, nelfinavir, nefazadone, amiodarone, amprenavir, aprepitant, diltiazem, erythromycin, fluconazole, fosamprenavir, grapefruit juice, and verapamil) leading to enhanced propoxyphene plasma levels. Coadministration with agents that induce CYP3A4 activity may reduce the efficacy of propoxyphene. Strong CYP3A4 inducers such as rifampin may lead to enhanced metabolite (norpropoxyphene) levels.

                    Propoxyphene is also thought to possess CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzyme inhibiting properties and coadministration with drugs that rely on either of these enzymes for metabolism may result in increased pharmacologic or adverse effects of that drug. Severe neurologic signs, including coma, have occurred with concurrent use of carbamazepine (metabolized by CYP3A4).

                    Increased risk of bleeding has been observed with warfarin-like agents when given along with propoxyphene; however, the mechanistic basis of this interaction is unknown.

                    Patients receiving narcotic analgesics, general anesthetics, phenothiazines, other tranquilizers, sedative-hypnotics or other CNS depressants (including alcohol) concomitantly with propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets may exhibit an additive CNS depression. Interactive effects resulting in respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, or coma may result if these drugs are taken in combination with the usual dosage of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets. When such combined therapy is contemplated, the dose of one or both agents should be reduced.

                    Agonist/antagonist analgesics (i.e., pentazocine, nalbuphine, butorphanol and buprenorphine) should be administered with caution to patients who have received or are receiving a course of therapy with a pure opioid agonist analgesic such as propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets. In this situation, mixed agonist/antagonist analgesics may reduce the analgesic effect of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets and/or may precipitate withdrawal symptoms in these patients.

                    MAOIs have been reported to intensify the effects of at least one opioid drug causing anxiety, confusion and significant depression of respiration or coma. The use of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets is not recommended for patients taking MAOIs or within 14 days of stopping such treatment.

                    CNS Depressants

                    Mixed Agonist/Antagonist Opioid Analgesics

                    Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

                    Drug Interactions With Acetaminophen

                    Alcohol

                    Anticholinergics

                    Oral Contraceptives

                    Beta Blockers (Propranolol)

                    Loop Diuretics

                    Lamotrigine

                    Probenecid

                    Zidovudine

                    Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

                    The mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of propoxyphene and acetaminophen alone and in combination have not been evaluated.

                    In animal studies there was no effect of propoxyphene on mating behavior, fertility, duration of gestation, or parturition when rats were fed propoxyphene as a component of their daily diet at estimated daily propoxyphene intake up to 8 fold greater than the maximum human equivalent dose (HED) based on body surface area comparison. At this highest dose, fetal weight and survival on postnatal day 4 was reduced. Acetaminophen has not been studied in animals for effects on fertility and the effects on human fertility are unknown.

                    Pregnancy

                    Nursing Mothers

                    Pediatric Patients

                    Geriatric Patients


                    What are the side effects of PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

                    During clinical trials, the most frequently reported adverse reactions were dizziness, sedation, nausea, and vomiting. Other adverse reactions include constipation, abdominal pain, skin rashes, lightheadedness, headache, weakness, euphoria, dysphoria, hallucinations, and minor visual disturbances.

                    The most frequently reported postmarketing adverse events have included completed suicide, accidental and intentional overdose, drug dependence, cardiac arrest, coma, drug ineffective, drug toxicity, nausea, respiratory arrest, cardio-respiratory arrest, death, vomiting, dizziness, convulsion, confusional state, and diarrhea.

                    Additional adverse experiences reported through postmarketing surveillance include:

                    Cardiac disorders:

                    Eye disorder:

                    General disorder and administration site conditions:

                    Gastrointestinal disorder:

                    Hepatobiliary disorder:

                    Immune system disorder:

                    Injury poisoning and procedural complications:

                    Investigations:

                    Metabolism and nutrition disorder:

                    Nervous system disorder:

                    Psychiatric:

                    Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders:

                    Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder:

                    Liver dysfunction has been reported in association with both active components of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets. Propoxyphene therapy has been associated with abnormal liver function tests and, more rarely, with instances of reversible jaundice (including cholestatic jaundice). Hepatic necrosis may result from acute overdose of acetaminophen (see ). In chronic ethanol abusers, this has been reported rarely with short-term use of acetaminophen dosages of 2.5 to 10 g/day. Fatalities have occurred.

                    There have also been postmarketing reports of renal papillary necrosis associated with chronic acetaminophen use, particularly when the dosage is greater than recommended and when combined with aspirin. Subacute painful myopathy has been reported following chronic propoxyphene overdosage.


                    What should I look out for while using PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to propoxyphene or acetaminophen.

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with significant respiratory depression (in unmonitored settings or the absence of resuscitative equipment) and patients with acute or severe asthma or hypercarbia.

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in any patient who has or is suspected of having paralytic ileus.

                    There have been numerous cases of accidental and intentional overdose with propoxyphene products either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, including alcohol. Fatalities within the first hour of overdosage are not uncommon. Many of the propoxyphene-related deaths have occurred in patients with previous histories of emotional disturbances or suicidal ideation/attempts and/or concomitant administration of sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, or other CNS-depressant drugs. Do not prescribe propoxyphene for patients who are suicidal or have a history of suicidal ideation.


                    What might happen if I take too much PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are a combination product containing propoxyphene and acetaminophen. Overdose of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets may present with the signs and symptoms of propoxyphene overdose, acetaminophen overdose or both. Fatalities within the first hour of overdosage are not uncommon.

                    In all cases of suspected overdosage, call your regional Poison Control Center to obtain the most up-to-date information about the treatment of overdose. This recommendation is made because, in general, information regarding the treatment of overdosage may change more rapidly than do package inserts.

                    Initial consideration should be given to the management of the CNS effects of propoxyphene overdosage. Resuscitative measures should be initiated promptly.


                    How should I store and handle PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE AND ACETAMINOPHEN?

                    Store bottles of 1000 SINGULAIR 5-mg chewable tablets and 8000 SINGULAIR 10-mg film-coated tablets at 25°C (77°F), excursions permitted to 15-30°C (59-86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from moisture and light. Store in original container. When product container is subdivided, repackage into a well-closed, light resistant container. 150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW150 mg tablets: peach to light-brown colored, round unscored tablets debossed“Par 544” on one side and plain on the other, supplied in blisters of 30 and 60 tablets.Store at 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place. Protect from light.Rx onlyManufactured byPar Pharmaceutical, iNCSpring Valley, NY 10977Repackaged by: Contract Pharmacy Services-PA125 Titus Ave Suite 200Warrington, PA 18976 USAOriginal--03/2010--NJW


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                    Clinical Information

                    Chemical Structure

                    No Image found
                    Clinical Pharmacology

                    Peak plasma concentrations of propoxyphene are reached in 2 to 2.5 h. After a 65 mg oral dose of propoxyphene hydrochloride, peak plasma levels of 0.05 to 0.1 mcg/mL for propoxyphene and 0.1 to 0.2 mcg/mL for norpropoxyphene (major metabolite) are achieved. Repeated doses of propoxyphene at 6 h intervals lead to increasing plasma concentrations, with a plateau after the ninth dose at 48 h. Propoxyphene has a half-life of 6 to 12 h, whereas that of norpropoxyphene is 30 to 36 h.

                    Acetaminophen is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and has a plasma half-life of 1.25 to 3 h, which may be increased by liver damage and following overdosage.

                    Propoxyphene is about 80% bound to proteins and has a large volume of distribution, 16 L/kg.

                    Acetaminophen is relatively uniformly distributed throughout most body fluids. Binding of the drug to plasma proteins is variable; only 20% to 50% may be bound at the concentrations encountered during acute intoxication.

                    Propoxyphene undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism by intestinal and hepatic enzymes. The major route of metabolism is cytochrome CYP3A4 mediated N-demethylation to norpropoxyphene, which is excreted by the kidneys. Ring hydroxylation and glucuronide formation are minor metabolic pathways.

                    Acetaminophen is extensively metabolized in the liver. Less than 5% of acetaminophen dose is excreted unchanged in the kidney. About 85% of an acetaminophen dose is metabolized by conjugation, mainly glucuronidation via UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (mainly UGT1A6) and to a lesser extent sulfation via sulfotransferase (mainly SLT1A1 and SLT1A3). The glucuronide and sulfate conjugates are nontoxic and are largely excreted in the urine and bile. About 8 to 10% of an acetaminophen dose is oxidized by cytochrome CYP2E1 to form the toxic reactive intermediate, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). NAPQI is further metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation, yielding non-toxic thiol metabolites including cysteine, mercapturate, methylthioacetaminophen, and methanesulfinylacetaminophen that are excreted in the urine. Acetaminophen is also oxidized at a low percentage by cytochrome CYP2A6 to form inert catechols (e.g., methoxyacetaminophen).

                    In 48 h, approximately 20 to 25% of the administered dose of propoxyphene is excreted via the urine, most of which is free or conjugated norpropoxyphene. The renal clearance rate of propoxyphene is 2.6 L/min.

                    Elimination of acetaminophen is principally by liver metabolism (conjugation) and subsequent renal excretion of metabolites. Approximately 85% of an oral dose appears in the urine within 24 hours of administration, most as the glucuronide conjugate, with small amounts of other conjugates and unchanged drug.

                    Non-Clinical Toxicology
                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to propoxyphene or acetaminophen.

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with significant respiratory depression (in unmonitored settings or the absence of resuscitative equipment) and patients with acute or severe asthma or hypercarbia.

                    Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in any patient who has or is suspected of having paralytic ileus.

                    There have been numerous cases of accidental and intentional overdose with propoxyphene products either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, including alcohol. Fatalities within the first hour of overdosage are not uncommon. Many of the propoxyphene-related deaths have occurred in patients with previous histories of emotional disturbances or suicidal ideation/attempts and/or concomitant administration of sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, or other CNS-depressant drugs. Do not prescribe propoxyphene for patients who are suicidal or have a history of suicidal ideation.

                    Although ranitidine has been reported to bind weakly to cytochrome P-450 in vitro, recommended doses of the drug do not inhibit the action of the cytochrome P-450-linked oxygenase enzymes in the liver. However, there have been isolated reports of drug interactions that suggest that ranitidine may affect the bioavailability of certain drugs by some mechanism as yet unidentified (e.g., a pH-dependent effect on absorption or a change in volume of distribution).

                    Increased or decreased prothrombin times have been reported during concurrent use of ranitidine and warfarin. However, in human pharmacokinetic studies with dosages of ranitidine up to 400 mg per day, no interaction occurred; ranitidine had no effect on warfarin clearance or prothrombin time. The possibility of an interaction with warfarin at dosages of ranitidine higher than 400 mg per day has not been investigated.

                    In a ranitidine-triazolam drug-drug interaction study, triazolam plasma concentrations were higher during b.i.d. dosing of ranitidine than triazolam given alone. The mean area under the triazolam concentration-time curve (AUC) values in 18 to 60 year old subjects were 10% and 28% higher following administration of 75 mg and 150 mg ranitidine tablets, respectively, than triazolam given alone. In subjects older than 60 years of age, the mean AUC values were approximately 30% higher following administration of 75 mg and 150 mg ranitidine tablets. It appears that there were no changes in pharmacokinetics of triazolam and α-hydroxytriazolam, a major metabolite, and in their elimination. Reduced gastric acidity due to ranitidine may have resulted in an increase in the availability of triazolam. The clinical significance of this triazolam and ranitidine pharmacokinetic interaction is unknown.

                    Tolerance is the need for increasing doses of opioids to maintain a defined effect such as analgesia (in the absence of disease progression or other external factors). Physical dependence is manifested by withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation of a drug or upon administration of an antagonist. Physical dependence and tolerance are not unusual during chronic opioid therapy.

                    The opioid abstinence or withdrawal syndrome is characterized by some or all of the following: restlessness, lacrimation, rhinorrhea, yawning, perspiration, chills, myalgia, and mydriasis. Other symptoms also may develop, including: irritability, anxiety, backache, joint pain, weakness, abdominal cramps, insomnia, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, or increased blood pressure, respiratory rate, or heart rate. In general, opioids should not be abruptly discontinued

                    If propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient, an abstinence syndrome may occur . If signs and symptoms of withdrawal occur, patients should be treated by reinstitution of opioid therapy followed by gradual tapered dose reduction of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets combined with symptomatic support

                    During clinical trials, the most frequently reported adverse reactions were dizziness, sedation, nausea, and vomiting. Other adverse reactions include constipation, abdominal pain, skin rashes, lightheadedness, headache, weakness, euphoria, dysphoria, hallucinations, and minor visual disturbances.

                    The most frequently reported postmarketing adverse events have included completed suicide, accidental and intentional overdose, drug dependence, cardiac arrest, coma, drug ineffective, drug toxicity, nausea, respiratory arrest, cardio-respiratory arrest, death, vomiting, dizziness, convulsion, confusional state, and diarrhea.

                    Additional adverse experiences reported through postmarketing surveillance include:

                    Cardiac disorders:

                    Eye disorder:

                    General disorder and administration site conditions:

                    Gastrointestinal disorder:

                    Hepatobiliary disorder:

                    Immune system disorder:

                    Injury poisoning and procedural complications:

                    Investigations:

                    Metabolism and nutrition disorder:

                    Nervous system disorder:

                    Psychiatric:

                    Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders:

                    Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder:

                    Liver dysfunction has been reported in association with both active components of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets. Propoxyphene therapy has been associated with abnormal liver function tests and, more rarely, with instances of reversible jaundice (including cholestatic jaundice). Hepatic necrosis may result from acute overdose of acetaminophen (see ). In chronic ethanol abusers, this has been reported rarely with short-term use of acetaminophen dosages of 2.5 to 10 g/day. Fatalities have occurred.

                    There have also been postmarketing reports of renal papillary necrosis associated with chronic acetaminophen use, particularly when the dosage is greater than recommended and when combined with aspirin. Subacute painful myopathy has been reported following chronic propoxyphene overdosage.

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                    Reference

                    This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
                    "https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

                    While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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                    Professional

                    Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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                    Interactions

                    Interactions

                    A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).