Disclaimer:

Medidex is not a provider of medical services and all information is provided for the convenience of the user. No medical decisions should be made based on the information provided on this website without first consulting a licensed healthcare provider.This website is intended for persons 18 years or older. No person under 18 should consult this website without the permission of a parent or guardian.

RAYOS

&times

Overview

What is RAYOS?

The active ingredient in RAYOS is prednisone (a corticosteroid). Corticosteroids are adrenocortical steroids, both naturally occurring and synthetic. The molecular formula for prednisone is CHO. The chemical name for prednisone is 17,21-dihydroxypregna-1,4-diene-3,11,20-trione, and the structural formula is:

Prednisone is a white to practically white, odorless, crystalline powder and has a molecular weight of 358.43. Prednisone is very slightly soluble in water; slightly soluble in alcohol, chloroform, dioxane, and methanol.

RAYOS is a delayed-release prednisone tablet. It consists of a prednisone-containing core tablet in an inactive shell, which delays the onset of in vitro drug dissolution by approximately 4 hours. Each tablet contains 1 mg, 2 mg, or 5 mg of prednisone, with the following inactive ingredients: dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, colloidal silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, glycerol dibehenate, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, povidone, yellow ferric oxide, and red ferric oxide.



What does RAYOS look like?



What are the available doses of RAYOS?

Delayed-release Tablets

What should I talk to my health care provider before I take RAYOS?

How should I use RAYOS?

RAYOS is indicated in the treatment of the following diseases or conditions:

Dosage of RAYOS should be individualized according to the severity of the disease and the response of the patient. For pediatric patients, the recommended dosage should be governed by the same considerations rather than strict adherence to the ratio indicated by age or body weight.

The maximal activity of the adrenal cortex is between 2 am and 8 am and is minimal between 4 pm and midnight. Exogenous corticosteroids suppress adrenocorticoid activity the least when given at the time of maximal activity. RAYOS is a delayed-release formulation of prednisone which releases the active substance beginning approximately 4 hours after intake []. The timing of RAYOS administration should take into account the delayed-release pharmacokinetics and the disease or condition being treated.

The initial dosage of RAYOS may vary from 5 to 60 mg per day depending on the specific disease entity being treated. Patients currently on immediate release prednisone, prednisolone, or methylprednisolone should be switched to RAYOS at an equivalent dose based on relative potency (2.4).

In situations of less severity, lower doses will generally suffice while in selected patients higher initial doses may be required. The initial dosage should be maintained or adjusted until a satisfactory response is noted. If after a reasonable period there is a lack of satisfactory clinical response, RAYOS should be discontinued and the patient transferred to other appropriate therapy. It should be emphasized that dosage requirements are variable and must be individualized on the basis of the disease under treatment and the response of the patient.

After a favorable response is noted, the proper maintenance dosage should be determined by decreasing the initial drug dosage in small decrements at appropriate time intervals until the lowest dosage which will maintain an adequate clinical response is reached. It should be kept in mind that constant monitoring is needed in regard to drug dosage. Included in the situations which may make dosage adjustments necessary are changes in clinical status secondary to remissions or exacerbations in the disease process, the patient's individual drug responsiveness, and the effect of patient exposure to stressful situations not directly related to the disease entity under treatment. In this latter situation it may be necessary to increase the dosage of RAYOS for a period of time consistent with the patient's condition. If a period of spontaneous remission occurs in a chronic condition, treatment should be discontinued. If after long-term therapy the drug is to be stopped, it is recommended that it be withdrawn gradually rather than abruptly.


What interacts with RAYOS?

Sorry No Records found


What are the warnings of RAYOS?

Sorry No Records found


What are the precautions of RAYOS?

Sorry No Records found


What are the side effects of RAYOS?

Sorry No records found


What should I look out for while using RAYOS?

RAYOS is contraindicated in patients who have known hypersensitivity to prednisone or to any of the excipients. Rare instances of anaphylaxis have occurred in patients receiving corticosteroid therapy [].


What might happen if I take too much RAYOS?

The effects of accidental ingestion of large quantities of prednisone over a very short period of time have not been reported, but prolonged use of the drug can produce mental symptoms, moon face, abnormal fat deposits, fluid retention, excessive appetite, weight gain, hypertrichosis, acne, striae, ecchymosis, increased sweating, pigmentation, dry scaly skin, thinning scalp hair, increased blood pressure, tachycardia, thrombophlebitis, decreased resistance to infection, negative nitrogen balance with delayed bone and wound healing, headache, weakness, menstrual disorders, accentuated menopausal symptoms, neuropathy, fractures, osteoporosis, peptic ulcer, decreased glucose tolerance, hypokalemia, and adrenal insufficiency. Hepatomegaly and abdominal distention have been observed in children.

Treatment of acute overdosage is by immediate gastric lavage or emesis followed by supportive and symptomatic therapy. For chronic overdosage in the face of severe disease requiring continuous steroid therapy the dosage of prednisone may be reduced only temporarily, or alternate day treatment may be introduced.


How should I store and handle RAYOS?

 Store at 20° to 25° C (68° to 77° F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30° C (59° to 86° F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep this drug and all drugs out of the reach of children.  Store at 20° to 25° C (68° to 77° F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30° C (59° to 86° F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep this drug and all drugs out of the reach of children.  Store at 20° to 25° C (68° to 77° F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30° C (59° to 86° F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep this drug and all drugs out of the reach of children. RAYOS delayed-release tablets (1 mg prednisone) are pale yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 1" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (2 mg prednisone) are yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 2" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (5 mg prednisone) are light yellow, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 5" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (1 mg prednisone) are pale yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 1" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (2 mg prednisone) are yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 2" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (5 mg prednisone) are light yellow, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 5" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (1 mg prednisone) are pale yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 1" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (2 mg prednisone) are yellowish-white, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 2" on one side and supplied as:RAYOS delayed-release tablets (5 mg prednisone) are light yellow, round, unscored tablets embossed with "NP 5" on one side and supplied as:


&times

Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

Naturally occurring corticosteroids (hydrocortisone and cortisone), which also have salt-retaining properties, are used as replacement therapy in adrenocortical deficiency states. Their synthetic analogs, such as prednisone, are primarily used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects in disorders of many organ systems.

Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, cause profound and varied metabolic effects. In addition, they modify the body's immune responses to diverse stimuli.

Prednisone is a synthetic adrenocortical steroid drug with predominantly corticosteroid properties. Some of these properties reproduce the physiological actions of endogenous glucocorticosteroids, but others do not necessarily reflect any of the adrenal hormones' normal functions; they are seen only after administration of large therapeutic doses of the drug. The pharmacological effects of prednisone which are due to its corticosteroid properties include: promotion of gluconeogenesis; increased deposition of glycogen in the liver; inhibition of the utilization of glucose; anti-insulin activity; increased catabolism of protein; increased lipolysis; stimulation of fat synthesis and storage; increased glomerular filtration rate and resulting increase in urinary excretion of urate (creatinine excretion remains unchanged); and increased calcium excretion.

Depressed production of eosinophils and lymphocytes occurs, but erythropoiesis and production of polymorphonuclear leukocytes are stimulated. Inflammatory processes (edema, fibrin deposition, capillary dilatation, migration of leukocytes and phagocytosis) and the later stages of wound healing (capillary proliferation, deposition of collagen, cicatrization) are inhibited.

Prednisone can stimulate secretion of various components of gastric juice. Suppression of the production of corticotropin may lead to suppression of endogenous corticosteroids. Prednisone has slight mineralocorticoid activity, whereby entry of sodium into cells and loss of intracellular potassium is stimulated. This is particularly evident in the kidney, where rapid ion exchange leads to sodium retention and hypertension.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
RAYOS is contraindicated in patients who have known hypersensitivity to prednisone or to any of the excipients. Rare instances of anaphylaxis have occurred in patients receiving corticosteroid therapy [].

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, Cushing's syndrome, and hyperglycemia. Monitor patients for these conditions with chronic use.

Corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for corticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal of treatment. Drug-induced secondary adrenocortical insufficiency may be minimized by gradual reduction of dosage. This type of relative insufficiency may persist for months after discontinuation of therapy; therefore, in any situation of stress occurring during that period, hormone therapy should be reinstituted. If the patient is receiving corticosteroids already, dosage may have to be increased.

Since mineralocorticoid secretion may be impaired, salt and/or a mineralocorticoid should be administered concurrently. Mineralocorticoid supplementation is of particular importance in infancy.

Metabolic clearance of corticosteroids is decreased in hypothyroid patients and increased in hyperthyroid patients. Changes in thyroid status of the patient may necessitate adjustment in dosage.

Common adverse reactions for corticosteroids include fluid retention, alteration in glucose tolerance, elevation in blood pressure, behavioral and mood changes, increased appetite and weight gain.

Allergic Reactions:

Cardiovascular:

Dermatologic:

Endocrine:

Fluid and Electrolyte Disturbances:

Gastrointestinal:

General:

Metabolic:

Musculoskeletal:

Neurological:

Ophthalmic:

Reproductive:

&times

Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

&times

Review

Rate this treatment and share your opinion


Helpful tips to write a good review:

  1. Only share your first hand experience as a consumer or a care giver.
  2. Describe your experience in the Comments area including the benefits, side effects and how it has worked for you. Do not provide personal information like email addresses or telephone numbers.
  3. Fill in the optional information to help other users benefit from your review.

Reason for Taking This Treatment

(required)

Click the stars to rate this treatment

This medication has worked for me.




This medication has been easy for me to use.




Overall, I have been satisfied with my experience.




Write a brief description of your experience with this treatment:

2000 characters remaining

Optional Information

Help others benefit from your review by filling in the information below.
I am a:
Gender:
&times

Professional

Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
&times

Tips

Tips

&times

Interactions

Interactions

A total of 440 drugs (1549 brand and generic names) are known to interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib). 228 major drug interactions (854 brand and generic names) 210 moderate drug interactions (691 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (4 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with Imbruvica (ibrutinib).