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Zestoretic

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Overview

What is Zestoretic?

ZESTORETIC (Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide) combines an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril, and a diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide.

Lisinopril, a synthetic peptide derivative, is an oral long-acting angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor.  It is chemically described as (S)-1-[N2-(1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl)-L-lysyl]-L-proline dihydrate.  Its empirical formula is CHNO . 2HO and its structural formula is:

Lisinopril is a white to off-white, crystalline powder, with a molecular weight of 441.53.  It is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in methanol, and practically insoluble in ethanol.

Hydrochlorothiazide is 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide.  Its empirical formula is CHClNOS and its structural formula is:

Hydrochlorothiazide is a white, or practically white, crystalline powder with a molecular weight of 297.72, which is slightly soluble in water, but freely soluble in sodium hydroxide solution.

ZESTORETIC is available for oral use in three tablet combinations of lisinopril with hydrochlorothiazide:  ZESTORETIC 10-12.5 containing 10 mg lisinopril and 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide; ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 containing 20 mg lisinopril and 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide; and, ZESTORETIC 20-25 containing 20 mg lisinopril and 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide.

Inactive Ingredients:

10-12.5 Tablets - calcium phosphate, magnesium stearate, mannitol, red ferric oxide, corn starch, yellow ferric oxide.

20-12.5 Tablets - calcium phosphate, magnesium stearate, mannitol, corn starch.

20-25 Tablets - calcium phosphate, magnesium stearate, mannitol, red ferric oxide, corn starch, yellow ferric oxide.



What does Zestoretic look like?



What are the available doses of Zestoretic?

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What should I talk to my health care provider before I take Zestoretic?

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How should I use Zestoretic?

ZESTORETIC is indicated for the treatment of hypertension, to lower blood pressure.  Lowering blood pressure lowers the risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, primarily strokes and myocardial infarctions.  These benefits have been seen in controlled trials of antihypertensive drugs from a wide variety of pharmacologic classes including lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide.

Control of high blood pressure should be part of comprehensive cardiovascular risk management, including, as appropriate, lipid control, diabetes management, antithrombotic therapy, smoking cessation, exercise, and limited sodium intake. Many patients will require more than 1 drug to achieve blood pressure goals. For specific advice on goals and management, see published guidelines, such as those of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program’s Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC).

Numerous antihypertensive drugs, from a variety of pharmacologic classes and with different mechanisms of action, have been shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and it can be concluded that it is blood pressure reduction, and not some other pharmacologic property of the drugs, that is largely responsible for those benefits.  The largest and most consistent cardiovascular outcome benefit has been a reduction in the risk of stroke, but reductions in myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality also have been seen regularly.

Elevated systolic or diastolic pressure causes increased cardiovascular risk, and the absolute risk increase per mmHg is greater at higher blood pressures, so that even modest reductions of severe hypertension can provide substantial benefit.  Relative risk reduction from blood pressure reduction is similar across populations with varying absolute risk, so the absolute benefit is greater in patients who are at higher risk independent of their hypertension (for example, patients with diabetes or hyperlipidemia), and such patients would be expected to benefit from more aggressive treatment to a lower blood pressure goal.

Some antihypertensive drugs have smaller blood pressure effects (as monotherapy) in black patients, and many antihypertensive drugs have additional approved indications and effects (e.g., on angina, heart failure, or diabetic kidney disease). These considerations may guide selection of therapy.

These fixed-dose combinations are not indicated for initial therapy (see ).

In using ZESTORETIC, consideration should be given to the fact that an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, has caused agranulocytosis, particularly in patients with renal impairment or collagen vascular disease, and that available data are insufficient to show that lisinopril does not have a similar risk (See ).

In considering the use of ZESTORETIC, it should be noted that ACE inhibitors have been associated with a higher rate of angioedema in black than in nonblack patients (see ).

Lisinopril monotherapy is an effective treatment of hypertension in once-daily doses of 10 mg to 80 mg, while hydrochlorothiazide monotherapy is effective in doses of 12.5 mg per day to 50 mg per day.  In clinical trials of lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy using lisinopril doses of 10 mg to 80 mg and hydrochlorothiazide doses of 6.25 mg to 50 mg, the antihypertensive response rates generally increased with increasing dose of either component.

The side effects (see ) of lisinopril are generally rare and apparently independent of dose; those of hydrochlorothiazide are a mixture of dose-dependent phenomena (primarily hypokalemia) and dose-independent phenomena (e.g., pancreatitis), the former much more common than the latter.  Therapy with any combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide may be associated with either or both dose-independent or dose-dependent side effects, but addition of lisinopril in clinical trials blunted the hypokalemia normally seen with diuretics.

To minimize dose-dependent side effects, it is usually appropriate to begin combination therapy only after a patient has failed to achieve the desired effect with monotherapy.

Dose Titration Guided by Clinical Effect:

In patients who are currently being treated with a diuretic, symptomatic hypotension occasionally may occur following the initial dose of lisinopril.  The diuretic should, if possible, be discontinued for two to three days before beginning therapy with lisinopril to reduce the likelihood of hypotension  (See ).  If the patient's blood pressure is not controlled with lisinopril alone, diuretic therapy may be resumed.

If the diuretic cannot be discontinued, an initial dose of 5 mg of lisinopril should be used under medical supervision for at least two hours and until blood pressure has stabilized for at least an additional hour (See and ).

Concomitant administration of ZESTORETIC with potassium supplements, potassium salt substitutes or potassium-sparing diuretics may lead to increases of serum potassium (See ).

Replacement Therapy:

Use in Renal Impairment:


What interacts with Zestoretic?

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What are the warnings of Zestoretic?

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Lisinopril

Anaphylactoid and Possibly Related Reactions:

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Patients receiving coadministration of ACE inhibitor and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor (e.g., temsirolimus, sirolimus, everolimus) therapy or a neprilysin inhibitor may be at increased risk for angioedema (see ).

Intestinal Angioedema:

Patients with a history of angioedema unrelated to ACE inhibitor therapy may be at increased risk of angioedema while receiving an ACE inhibitor (see also and ).

Anaphylactoid Reactions During Desensitization:

Anaphylactoid Reactions during Membrane Exposure:

Hypotension and Related Effects:

Syncope has been reported in 0.8 percent of patients receiving ZESTORETIC. In patients with hypertension receiving lisinopril alone, the incidence of syncope was 0.1 percent.  The overall incidence of syncope may be reduced by proper titration of the individual components (See, and ).

In patients with severe congestive heart failure, with or without associated renal insufficiency, excessive hypotension has been observed and may be associated with oliguria and/or progressive azotemia, and rarely with acute renal failure and/or death.  Because of the potential fall in blood pressure in these patients, therapy should be started under very close medical supervision.  Such patients should be followed closely for the first two weeks of treatment and whenever the dose of lisinopril and/or diuretic is increased.  Similar considerations apply to patients with ischemic heart or cerebrovascular disease in whom an excessive fall in blood pressure could result in a myocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident.

If hypotension occurs, the patient should be placed in the supine position and, if necessary, receive an intravenous infusion of normal saline.  A transient hypotensive response is not a contraindication to further doses which usually can be given without difficulty once the blood pressure has increased after volume expansion.

Leukopenia/Neutropenia/Agranulocytosis:

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Pregnancy category D

In the unusual case that there is no appropriate alternative to therapy with drugs affecting the renin-angiotensin system for a particular patient, apprise the mother of the potential risk to the fetus. Perform serial ultrasound examinations to assess the intra-amniotic environment. If oligohydramnios is observed, discontinue ZESTORETIC, unless it is considered lifesaving for the mother. Fetal testing may be appropriate, based on the week of pregnancy. Patients and physicians should be aware, however, that oligohydramnios may not appear until after the fetus has sustained irreversible injury. Closely observe infants with histories of in utero exposure to ZESTORETIC for hypotension, oliguria, and hyperkalemia. (See ).

No teratogenic effects of lisinopril were seen in studies of pregnant rats, mice, and rabbits. On a mg/kg basis, the doses used were up to 625 times (in mice), 188 times (in rats), and 0.6 times (in rabbits) the maximum recommended human dose.

Lisinopril and Hydrochlorothiazide

Teratogenicity studies were conducted in mice and rats with up to 90 mg/kg/day of lisinopril (56 times the maximum recommended human dose) in combination with 10 mg/kg/day of hydrochlorothiazide (2.5 times the maximum recommended human dose). Maternal or fetotoxic effects were not seen in mice with the combination. In rats decreased maternal weight gain and decreased fetal weight occurred down to 3/10 mg/kg/day (the lowest dose tested). Associated with the decreased fetal weight was a delay in fetal ossification. The decreased fetal weight and delay in fetal ossification were not seen in saline-supplemented animals given 90/10 mg/kg/day.

When used in pregnancy, during the second and third trimesters, ACE inhibitors can cause injury and even death to the developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, discontinue ZESTORETIC as soon as possible (See).

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Hydrochlorothiazide

Acute Myopia and Secondary Angle-Closure Glaucoma:

Teratogenic Effects:

Nonteratogenic Effects:

Hydrochlorothiazide

Thiazides should be used with caution in severe renal disease.  In patients with renal disease, thiazides may precipitate azotemia.  Cumulative effects of the drug may develop in patients with impaired renal function.

Thiazides should be used with caution in patients with impaired hepatic function or progressive liver disease, since minor alterations of fluid and electrolyte balance may precipitate hepatic coma.

Sensitivity reactions may occur in patients with or without a history of allergy or bronchial asthma.

The possibility of exacerbation or activation of systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported.

Lithium generally should not be given with thiazides (See and ).

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What are the precautions of Zestoretic?

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General

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Aortic Stenosis/Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy:

Impaired Renal Function:

In hypertensive patients with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis, increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine may occur.  Experience with another angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests that these increases are usually reversible upon discontinuation of lisinopril and/or diuretic therapy.  In such patients renal function should be monitored during the first few weeks of therapy.

Some hypertensive patients with no apparent pre-existing renal vascular disease have developed increases in blood urea and serum creatinine, usually minor and transient, especially when lisinopril has been given concomitantly with a diuretic.  This is more likely to occur in patients with pre-existing renal impairment.  Dosage reduction of lisinopril and/or discontinuation of the diuretic may be required.

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Hyperkalemia:

Cough:

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Periodic determination of serum electrolytes to detect possible electrolyte imbalance should be performed at appropriate intervals.

All patients receiving thiazide therapy should be observed for clinical signs of fluid or electrolyte imbalance:  namely, hyponatremia, hypochloremic alkalosis, and hypokalemia. Serum and urine electrolyte determinations are particularly important when the patient is vomiting excessively or receiving parenteral fluids.  Warning signs or symptoms of fluid and electrolyte imbalance, irrespective of cause, include dryness of mouth, thirst, weakness, lethargy, drowsiness, restlessness, confusion, seizures, muscle pains or cramps, muscular fatigue, hypotension, oliguria, tachycardia, and gastrointestinal disturbances such as nausea and vomiting.

Hypokalemia may develop, especially with brisk diuresis, when severe cirrhosis is present, or after prolonged therapy.

Interference with adequate oral electrolyte intake will also contribute to hypokalemia. Hypokalemia may cause cardiac arrhythmia and may also sensitize or exaggerate the response of the heart to the toxic effects of digitalis (e.g., increased ventricular irritability). Because lisinopril reduces the production of aldosterone, concomitant therapy with lisinopril attenuates the diuretic-induced potassium loss (See).

Although any chloride deficit is generally mild and usually does not require specific treatment, except under extraordinary circumstances (as in liver disease or renal disease), chloride replacement may be required in the treatment of metabolic alkalosis.

Dilutional hyponatremia may occur in edematous patients in hot weather; appropriate therapy is water restriction, rather than administration of salt except in rare instances when the hyponatremia is life-threatening.  In actual salt depletion, appropriate replacement is the therapy of choice.

Hyperuricemia may occur or frank gout may be precipitated in certain patients receiving thiazide therapy.

In diabetic patients dosage adjustments of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents may be required.  Hyperglycemia may occur with thiazide diuretics.  Thus latent diabetes mellitus may become manifest during thiazide therapy.

The antihypertensive effects of the drug may be enhanced in the postsympathectomy patient.

If progressive renal impairment becomes evident consider withholding or discontinuing diuretic therapy.

Thiazides have been shown to increase the urinary excretion of magnesium; this may result in hypomagnesemia.

Thiazides may decrease urinary calcium excretion.  Thiazides may cause intermittent and slight elevation of serum calcium in the absence of known disorders of calcium metabolism. Marked hypercalcemia may be evidence of hidden hyperparathyroidism.  Thiazides should be discontinued before carrying out tests for parathyroid function.

Increases in cholesterol and triglyceride levels may be associated with thiazide diuretic therapy.

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Information for Patients

Angioedema:

Symptomatic Hypotension:

All patients should be cautioned that excessive perspiration and dehydration may lead to an excessive fall in blood pressure because of reduction in fluid volume. Other causes of volume depletion such as vomiting or diarrhea may also lead to a fall in blood pressure; patients should be advised to consult with their physician.

Hyperkalemia:

Leukopenia/Neutropenia:

Pregnancy:

NOTE:

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Drug Interactions

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Hypotension - Patients on Diuretic Therapy:

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents including Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors (COX-2 Inhibitors):

The antihypertensive effect of ACE inhibitors, including lisinopril, may be attenuated by NSAIDs.

Dual Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS)

The VA NEPHRON trial enrolled 1448 patients with type 2 diabetes, elevated urinary-albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR 30 to 89.9 ml/min), randomized them to lisinopril or placebo on a background of losartan therapy and followed them for a median of 2.2 years.  Patients receiving the combination of losartan and lisinopril did not obtain any additional benefit compared to monotherapy for the combined endpoint of decline in GFR, end state renal disease, or death, but experienced an increased incidence of hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury compared with the monotherapy group.

In general, avoid combined use of RAS inhibitors, closely monitor blood pressure, renal function and electrolytes in patients on ZESTORETIC and other agents that affect the RAS.

Do not co-administer aliskiren with ZESTORETIC in patients with diabetes.  Avoid use of aliskiren with ZESTORETIC in patients with renal impairment (GFR
Other Agents:

Agents Increasing Serum Potassium:

Lithium:

mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors

Neprilysin Inhibitors

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When administered concurrently the following drugs may interact with thiazide diuretics.

Alcohol, barbiturates, or narcotics -

Antidiabetic drugs (oral agents and insulin) -

Other antihypertensive drugs -

Cholestyramine and colestipol resins -

Corticosteroids, ACTH -

Pressor amines (e.g., norepinephrine) -

Skeletal muscle relaxants, nondepolarizing (e.g., tubocurarine) -

Lithium -

Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs -

Gold:

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Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

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Lisinopril in combination with hydrochlorothiazide was not mutagenic in a microbial mutagen test using (Ames test) or with or without metabolic activation or in a forward mutation assay using Chinese hamster lung cells.  Lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide did not produce DNA single strand breaks in an alkaline elution rat hepatocyte assay.  In addition, it did not produce increases in chromosomal aberrations in an test in Chinese hamster ovary cells or in an study in mouse bone marrow.

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There was no evidence of a tumorigenic effect when lisinopril was administered for 105 weeks to male and female rats at doses up to 90 mg/kg/day (about 56 or 9 times the maximum daily human dose, based on body weight and body surface area, respectively).  There was no evidence of carcinogenicity when lisinopril was administered for 92 weeks to (male and female) mice at doses up to 135 mg/kg/day (about 84 times the maximum recommended daily human dose).  This dose was 6.8 times the maximum human dose based on body surface area in mice.

Lisinopril was not mutagenic in the Ames microbial mutagen test with or without metabolic activation.  It was also negative in a forward mutation assay using Chinese hamster lung cells.  Lisinopril did not produce single strand DNA breaks in an alkaline elution rat hepatocyte assay.  In addition, lisinopril did not produce increases in chromosomal aberrations in an test in Chinese hamster ovary cells or in an study in mouse bone marrow.

There were no adverse effects on reproductive performance in male and female rats treated with up to 300 mg/kg/day of lisinopril.  This dose is 188 times and 30 times the maximum daily human dose based on mg/kg and mg/m, respectively.

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Two-year feeding studies in mice and rats conducted under the auspices of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) uncovered no evidence of a carcinogenic potential of hydrochlorothiazide in female mice (at doses of up to approximately 600 mg/kg/day) or in male and female rats (at doses of up to approximately 100 mg/kg/day).  These doses are 150 times and 12 times for mice and 25 times and 4 times for rats the maximum human daily dose based on mg/kg and mg/m, respectively.  The NTP, however, found equivocal evidence for hepatocarcinogenicity in male mice.

Hydrochlorothiazide was not genotoxic in the Ames mutagenicity assay of strains TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535, TA 1537, and TA 1538 and in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) test for chromosomal aberrations, or in assays using mouse germinal cell chromosomes, Chinese hamster bone marrow chromosomes, and the sex-linked recessive lethal trait gene.  Positive test results were obtained only in the CHO Sister Chromatid Exchange (clastogenicity) and in the Mouse Lymphoma Cell (mutagenicity) assays, using concentrations of hydrochlorothiazide from 43 mcg/mL to 1300 mcg/mL, and in the nondisjunction assay at an unspecified concentration.

Hydrochlorothiazide had no adverse effects on the fertility of mice and rats of either sex in studies wherein these species were exposed, via their diet, to doses of up to 100 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg, respectively, prior to conception and throughout gestation.  In mice this dose is 25 times and 2 times the maximum daily human dose based on mg/kg and mg/m, respectively.  In rats this dose is 1 times and 0.2 times the maximum daily human dose based on mg/kg and mg/m, respectively.

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Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether lisinopril is excreted in human milk.  However, milk of lactating rats contains radioactivity following administration of C lisinopril.  In another study, lisinopril was present in rat milk at levels similar to plasma levels in the dams.  Thiazides do appear in human milk.  Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from ACE inhibitors and hydrochlorothiazide, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing and/or discontinue ZESTORETIC, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

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Pediatric Use

Neonates with a history of in utero exposure to ZESTORETIC:

If oliguria or hypotension occurs, direct attention toward support of blood pressure and renal perfusion.  Exchange transfusions or dialysis may be required as a means of reversing hypotension and/or substituting for disordered renal function.  Lisinopril, which crosses the placenta, has been removed from neonatal circulation by peritoneal dialysis with some clinical benefit, and theoretically may be removed by exchange transfusion, although there is no experience with the latter procedure.

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

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Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of ZESTORETIC did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects.  Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients.  In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

This drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function.  Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection.  Evaluation of the hypertensive patient should always include assessment of renal function.


What are the side effects of Zestoretic?

Sorry No records found


What should I look out for while using Zestoretic?

ZESTORETIC is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to this product and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and in patients with hereditary or idiopathic angioedema.  Because of the hydrochlorothiazide component, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.

ZESTORETIC is contraindicated in combination with a neprilysin inhibitor (e.g., sacubitril). Do not administer ZESTORETIC within 36 hours of switching to or from sacubitril/valsartan, a neprilysin inhibitor (see ). Do not co-administer aliskiren with ZESTORETIC in patients with diabetes (see ).


What might happen if I take too much Zestoretic?

No specific information is available on the treatment of overdosage with ZESTORETIC. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive.  Therapy with ZESTORETIC should be discontinued and the patient observed closely.  Suggested measures include induction of emesis and/or gastric lavage, and correction of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and hypotension by established procedures.


How should I store and handle Zestoretic?

Store the vials in original cartons between 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F). [See .] Retain in the original package to protect from light.ZESTORETIC 10-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-25 Tablets:ZESTORETIC 10-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-25 Tablets:ZESTORETIC 10-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 Tablets: ZESTORETIC 20-25 Tablets:


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Clinical Information

Chemical Structure

No Image found
Clinical Pharmacology

As a result of its diuretic effects, hydrochlorothiazide increases plasma renin activity, increases aldosterone secretion, and decreases serum potassium.  Administration of lisinopril blocks the renin-angiotensin aldosterone axis and tends to reverse the potassium loss associated with the diuretic.

In clinical studies, the extent of blood pressure reduction seen with the combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide was approximately additive.  The ZESTORETIC 10-12.5 combination worked equally well in black and white patients.  The ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 and ZESTORETIC 20-25 combinations appeared somewhat less effective in black patients, but relatively few black patients were studied.  In most patients, the antihypertensive effect of ZESTORETIC was sustained for at least 24 hours.

In a randomized, controlled comparison, the mean antihypertensive effects of ZESTORETIC 20-12.5 and ZESTORETIC 20-25 were similar, suggesting that many patients who respond adequately to the latter combination may be controlled with ZESTORETIC 20-12.5  (See ).

Concomitant administration of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide has little or no effect on the bioavailability of either drug.  The combination tablet is bioequivalent to concomitant administration of the separate entities.

Non-Clinical Toxicology
ZESTORETIC is contraindicated in patients who are hypersensitive to this product and in patients with a history of angioedema related to previous treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and in patients with hereditary or idiopathic angioedema.  Because of the hydrochlorothiazide component, this product is contraindicated in patients with anuria or hypersensitivity to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.

ZESTORETIC is contraindicated in combination with a neprilysin inhibitor (e.g., sacubitril). Do not administer ZESTORETIC within 36 hours of switching to or from sacubitril/valsartan, a neprilysin inhibitor (see ). Do not co-administer aliskiren with ZESTORETIC in patients with diabetes (see ).

ZESTORETIC has been evaluated for safety in 930 patients including 100 patients treated for 50 weeks or more.

In clinical trials with ZESTORETIC no adverse experiences peculiar to this combination drug have been observed.  Adverse experiences that have occurred have been limited to those that have been previously reported with lisinopril or hydrochlorothiazide.

The most frequent clinical adverse experiences in controlled trials (including open label extensions) with any combination of lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide were:  dizziness (7.5%), headache (5.2%), cough (3.9%), fatigue (3.7%) and orthostatic effects (3.2%) all of which were more common than in placebo-treated patients.  Generally, adverse experiences were mild and transient in nature, but see regarding angioedema and excessive hypotension or syncope.  Discontinuation of therapy due to adverse effects was required in 4.4% of patients principally because of dizziness, cough, fatigue and muscle cramps.

Adverse experiences occurring in greater than one percent of patients treated with lisinopril plus hydrochlorothiazide in controlled clinical trials are shown below.

Percent of Patients in Controlled Studies

Clinical adverse experiences occurring in 0.3% to 1.0% of patients in controlled trials and rarer, serious, possibly drug-related events reported in marketing experience are listed below:

Body as a Whole:

Cardiovascular:

Digestive:

Musculoskeletal:

Nervous/Psychiatric:

Respiratory:

Skin:

Special Senses:

Urogenital:

Angioedema:

In rare cases, intestinal angioedema has been reported in post marketing experience.

Hypotension:

Cough:

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Reference

This information is obtained from the National Institute of Health's Standard Packaging Label drug database.
"https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/"

While we update our database periodically, we cannot guarantee it is always updated to the latest version.

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Clonazepam Description Each single-scored tablet, for oral administration, contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg Clonazepam, USP, a benzodiazepine. Each tablet also contains corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and povidone. Clonazepam tablets USP 0.5 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake. Clonazepam tablets USP 1 mg contain Yellow D&C No. 10 Aluminum Lake, as well as FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Chemically, Clonazepam, USP is 5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-7-nitro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one. It is a light yellow crystalline powder. It has the following structural formula: C15H10ClN3O3 M.W. 315.72
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Tips

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Interactions

Interactions

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